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sherpa325

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About sherpa325

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  • Bike
    4xbultaco, gasgas300
  • Club
    Denman & Pacific Park

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  • Location
    Australia
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    Male

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  1. I made my own after giving up trying to buy one, the problem is that they only fit the 'b' models. It was a fair bit of fiddly work as I just copied photos.
  2. I am not that great with electronics, but I have electric arc welded footpeg mounts on many Bultacos, with the points ignition system intact, and have never had a problem.
  3. Haven't bought a rod kit recently, but in the past have never had trouble getting them.
  4. I had to buy a header pipe/muffler for my 199B, bought one from Spain on Ebay from a 199A. It does fit the 199B- no modifications, but I cant be 100% sure it was from a 199A. I would imagine that any pipe from a 199, 199A 0r 199B would fit [the bolt on flange type] even if a little massaging was required, depends how handy you are. Cheers Greg
  5. Hi, I made this table a couple of years ago as a reference. [the measurements are averages as most are 'as cast' not machined- some have a 1/4mm oval variation] Manifold Airbox Bing [325] 39.5mm 45.2mm Amal[250] 34.5 49.1 Inmotion sell all of the above sizes Keihin/OKO 34.8 49.9 Dellorto phbl 26 31.0 39.4 43.3 [with gasgas rubber sleeve] Dellorto phbh 28 35.8 43.3 Mikuni 28 34.5 44 i just run the 250 inlet and airbox sizes on mine and it all fits pretty good, with the Keihin
  6. All the 325 powered bikes I have owned had the heavier flywheels on both sides, including a 159 and a 191, all owned from new. From the 159 onwards the engines pretty much all perform the same in my opinion. Differences in bikes I would put down to the type of carburetor being used and also the timing of the ignition system and general freshness of the engine. Bings make good power but I always found them finicky, Mk 2 Amals are better off the bottom but not as strong up top [27mm] and wear out quickly, Dellortos are good as are the 28mm keihin flatslide. I purchased an oko [keihin knockoff] off ebay and could not get it to work at all and ended up throwing it away and replacing with a genuine keihin. The keihin is smoother than the dellorto and makes more top end and is pretty easy to jet, however I didn't spend as much time as I should have on the Dellorto as flatslides became legal where I compete. I have tried to use Mikunis in the past with varied success, I found them really very smooth but always thought they were lacking in power in comparison to other brands - just a personal preference thing. By the way a friend has a 28mm flatslide mikuni on his 159 and it runs really well with plenty of power.
  7. This can be a real problem, the solution is to either take the bike to a bike shop and have the brake system vacuum bled or buy a vacuum pump kit yourself. Luckily I have a bike shop 5mins away from me where a mate who rides trials works and if I cant get a firm brake after a couple of goes myself, I take it to him and he does it in about 10mins. Google vacuum brake bleeding to get a better idea. The shop shouldn't charge you too much to do it if you have your own brake fluid etc-$20 Cheers Greg
  8. M190 from the 9/1976 to 2/1977
  9. The blue one is an M92 series 1 325cc ,the slimlines[tank shape] are possibly one of the prettiest bullys made however, If you are actually going to ride and compete on one of them the red one is the better bet. Cheers Greg
  10. Bultacos are great but I am biased. Parts are reasonably easy to pick up, there are a few suppliers and plenty of reproduction parts available. The restoration cost/difficulty depends on how much you are prepared or are capable of doing yourself, the bikes themselves are quite basic and simple to work on and reliable as well. I assume you are referring to the red bike which should have M199[1978] stamped on the headstock and on the engine cases near the oil filler plug [198 is a 250]. The bike looks like a good project as it appears to be in reasonable condition and just as important it looks to be complete [missing either the gearchange or brakepedal on the right side] The blue bike looks like an M92 325 1972/73 Cheers Greg
  11. It may prove difficult to machine the 5 speed gear to suit the 6 speed box as the gear teeth should be case hardened to provide a hard wearing surface. Whether or not the case hardening extends down the face is anybody's guess.
  12. Just pulled the chain and sprocket off my 199B as I couldn't remember what the difference was and also couldn't remember buying a different sprocket. So the difference is in the sleeve/spacer that goes between the sprocket and bearing has a larger Outside diameter 35mm - still has the same ID 25mm. So the shaft is still 25mm and a std sprocket fits obviously. The difference is the sprocket is tightened up against an increased surface area 35/25 as originally 30/25 -maybe increased rigidity. I assume maybe this was an upgrade to fix the problem, who knows?? My cases have been bored out to fit the larger seal OD45 / ID35 original is OD40 / ID30. My engine number is 199 14033 B. Hope this helps Cheers Greg
  13. Thanks bondy, any chance of photos of the 5 speed gear for comparison. I know the sleeve that slides over the shaft behind the sprocket is different on mine compared,to the 5 speed, as I had to make one- couldn't buy one anywhere
  14. As Woody has already said the gear is the same number of teeth as the five speed box, so if anyone could compare the two gears to see what the difference is, I think this would be beneficial for all of us 199B owners- bondy? I am not aware of this being a problem on the 5 speeds so I wonder if they narrowed the gears in order to fit sixth in the box, never thought to check when I had mine apart. Cheers Greg
  15. These are the overall ratios with standard gearing as delivered from the factory 11/46 [M159] 11/39[199A & B] M159 M199A M199B 1st 37.7:1 37.7:1 37.7:1 2nd 29:1 29.3:1 29.3:1 3rd 22.4:1 22.3:1 22.35:1 4th 13.7:1 13.7:1 16.4:1 5th 9.9:1 8.4:1 11.4:1 6th 8.4:1 You can see 5th is taller on the 199A gearbox and all other ratios are near identical on the 5 speed boxes. Fourth and fifth are different on the six speed box The reason the bikes have a higher top speed is the changing of the final ratio from 11/46 to 11/39 which still keeps the first four gears the same overall ratio, but allows an overall taller top gear. The change also obviously uses a smaller rear sprocket as well, so less likely to be damaged.