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Intotrials

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About Intotrials

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    Gas Gas

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    Staffordshire
  1. New challenges ...

    I believe trials riding is the best introduction to off road motorcycle riding you can do. Established trials riders can go on to be master all forms of off roading, the likes of former British champion Graham Jarvis as a prime example. Trials riding refines your motorbiking skills, such as balance, throttle control, clutch and brake control learning to feel the bike and reacting to it.... In fact many if not most of the top riders in disciplines like moto x and enduro all train on a trials bike as part of their training routines. Also the beauty of trials is - its relatively safe (low speed) and also one of the cheapest forms of motor sport you can do. My only advice to you would be that a 290cc trials bike can be a handful, especially for a beginner (I'm not trying to put you off) it can just be a bit scary at first (though the 2008 model will be a lot softer than a more modern version). I would probably have recommended you try out something like a 125 - 200 to start with they can be a lot of fun and won't pull your arms off. Good luck & I hope you have lots of fun riding!!
  2. I wonder...

    A mate of mine is big into his fitness & bodybuilding. He concocted an "energy" drink for me to use when I ride, one which he uses to train with. He eventually persuaded me to give it a go at my next practice session. All I can say is my god! Half an hour after drinking half of it I was buzzing! I suddenly became all excited on the bike and was riding with a lot of vigor to say the least! Though I was also doing a lot of crashing as a consequence, needless to say I didn't finish the drink and have not had it since. I can see why athletes would be tempted to take enhancement drugs, but I would not condone it.
  3. Beginning of the end?

    Yes but I meant it as a career ending injury. Obviously breaking your back is very serious, as I well know.
  4. Busto - the man to watch

    He certainly seems like the person to take Bou's crown. I watched a video of him in practice and he is definitely as good as Bou ability wise, at least from that footage I watched. I think once he manages to put his practice ability into competitions with the same confidence and extra experience he will, as Bou begins to fade, take over. Will we see signs of that this year, yeah for sure, but will it be enough to take the crown?
  5. Beginning of the end?

    I never said it wasn't? Though it has obviously affected his riding it wasn't debilitating enough to end his career this time. I broke my back in a car accident when I was just 17, I was left paralysed for just short of 6 months. Luckily I made a full recovery and (touch wood) it has had no lasting debilitating effects. Maybe when I'm older (from what the doctor told me) I may suffer with problems around where the break happened. Bou has recovered and yes it will affect his confidence and probably made him realize that he is not invincible.
  6. Beginning of the end?

    I agree with all your points and think your opinions are valid. Bou, like Doug used to, excel when the trials are tougher, they tend to step up a gear, which is what goes towards what makes them great champions. I think inevitably Busto will succeed Bou, or at least its shaping up that way. But I don't think Bou is done just yet, failing a serious injury I think he will continue to fight for and win championships for the next couple of years yet.
  7. How good to do ssdt?

    I know how you feel! The first time I rode it I under estimated how fit you need to be. I was riding in the British championships and regular nationals to a reasonable standard and being young with attitude expected it to be a breeze. It certainly knocked me down a peg or two! The following year I made sure I was physically prepared and it made all the difference! Unfortunately on the 5th day heading for a top twenty finish my bike seized up on the road and it was game over. My advise to anyone attempting the SSDT get as fit physically and fit "bike wise", as you can and make sure you prepare your bike & kit immaculately with plenty of back up and spares. As been mentioned if the sections don't drain you the weather and moor crossings will!
  8. MAJESTY questions

    If I recall correctly, MAJESTY stands for - Mick Andrews, John E Shirt, TY it was the brain child of Mick Andrews and Yamaha importer (at the time) John Shirt Senior. I believe it was a stock TY that was modified & improved by these two guys, more power, different geometry, different seat & tank... Mick was heavily involved with the Yamaha factory and John was the UK Yamaha importer both form the Derbyshire area I could be wrong, somebody with more knowledge of the history of Majesty will correct me. I was just a school boy rider at the time and was getting coaching from Mick and my father was friends with John so I'm just going off my memory from when I was a young lad.
  9. Observation

    When I said benefit of the doubt, that's what I meant. With modern trials it can be difficult to define what a "stop" is exactly. Years back it was quite simple you just watched for the wheels to stop turning. These days a bike can be still on the move with both wheels stopped. What I try and look for is a lack of forward motion, but even then this can be erroneous. You are quite correct, if its no stop then to be strict to the rules, any pause of forward movement regardless how brief is a fail. Try observing like this at a championship event, you'd be lynched.
  10. Observation

    I agree with you entirely, what I witnessed was a p*** take this was the reason for my original posting. I know how tough it can be to observe, I have done so on many occasions. Being a rider myself I tend to give most riders the benefit of the doubt, I'm quite lenient if the section is a tough one (maybe I'm wrong to do that). But I won't favor any particular rider/s, its only fair to everyone to be consistent. A friend of mine observed at the world round a few years back. He fived Bou for stopping, there was hell to pay but he stood to his guns to the disgruntlement of the spectators. The five was overruled by officials later in the comp for being "too harsh". I don't necessarily blame the observers as it can be a nightmare job at times. But in the case I mentioned which happened to be at the SSDT, it was a blatant failure of the section, which many other lesser riders had completed clean. I felt this was totally unfair to everyone.
  11. Observation

    Yes (my bold), sorry I've gone off the main topic slightly. Yes my initial grumble was that a top rider was witnessed by myself and also recorded on video to have blatantly fived a section under the no stop rules in the SSDT. I won't disclose any name because I suspect this person is not the only top rider to get away with it and my opinion will make no difference anyway. In the grand scheme of things it probably all evens out and maybe doesn't matter too much. But, I just felt on this particular occasion the offence was so blatant it made a mockery of the rules and was unfair for all the other riders. Like I said, it took the shine off for me, especially as I have a lot of respect and admire the rider in question.
  12. Observation

    When I'm out on my practicing I often try out sections with stop allowed and then no stop allowed. Amazingly if a section is well plotted its often quite surprising what can be achieved without stopping, when at times you may feel you need to stop. I have a section where I practice I have never cleaned. Its a very long and technical section and quite tight in places, I tend to stop and correct my self many times during attempts. A couple of weeks ago just for fun I attempted the section in 1st gear (there is quite a big step mid way so I usually do the section in 2nd) and tried to stay moving. To my surprise I manage to complete the section no stop and did it for a quick prod. Yes i had to scream the balls off the bike to get up the big step, but I found parts of the section easier without the stopping. I attempted the section again in 2nd without stopping but found the bike getting away from me and had to use the clutch more to tame the power just to stay in control without the stops. I now ride this section no stop and I know there is a clean ride just around the corner as I only ever have the odd dab on it now. I enjoy both styles of riding, I love the trick riding, with the back wheel hops and the jumping from rock to rock, i'm pretty good at it for an older rider. But I also love the feeling of flowing methodically through a section, smoothly and in full control just floating over the terrain. But sometimes I find myself riding both styles to complete a section. This is where the problem rises, how do you observer such a section if the rules are no stop? A brief momentary pause as you flick the bike can be very skillful and great to watch. As an observer how do you five a person for such an impressive ride even if they have stopped for a blink of an eye? Pre- trick riding days this wasn't a problem. But you can't undo progress, you have to adapt.
  13. Observation

    The rules then need to be adhered to the letter, no exception.
  14. Observation

    This is a good example, I think consistency across the board is the key. But to truly achieve this then what ever rules are in place for the event should be adhered to, with no exception. The difficulty is enforcing those rules without facing conflict and abuse, and often interpreting them (as in - what is deemed as a stop).
  15. Observation

    Absolutely (my bold) though my grumble is I witnessed the opposite to what you mention. I saw a top rider blatantly five a section, he got stuck on a rock, stopped dead, went backwards off the rock to recover and struggled a while to get moving again to continue the section - not a, "well the observer was just lenient" situation in my eyes. It was videoed and now has suddenly "disappeared" from the web. I love trials and I love the SSDT I just don't want the scoring to turn into a farce. As you say people pay good money for the privilege to ride the event, surely everyone deserves a fair result at the end?
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