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petertlr

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    18
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About petertlr

  • Rank
    New Member
  • Birthday

Previous Fields

  • Bike
    TYS-200

Profile Information

  • Location
    Honolulu
  • Gender
    Male
  1. TLR 200

    From the album TLR pics

    This is my Japanese TLR 200 at play.
  2. Scorpa press

    From the album TLR pics

    I love the lightness of my TY-S 200!
  3. TY-S 200

    From the album TLR pics

    TY-S heading up for a step.
  4. Reflex play

    From the album TLR pics

    Power to burn on the little TLR.
  5. Reflex w mods

    From the album TLR pics

    My Relex and the mods that make it work so well.
  6. I had both together and liked them both. I preferred the Reflex. The steel rims were stronger on the Reflex. The Reflex front brake was stronger, even tho it was smaller diameter. The Reflex suspension was less harsh also. It's good to replace the rear shocks, they blow seals quickly. Both good bikes with a few mods. See my mods on my other posts.
  7. I have one of each, differences are minimal in actual riding-these bikes are magic offroad. Front brake size, skid plate, rims, forks, are main diffs. Those alum rims do corrode badly and the shocks on both are trash even brand new. Also seating position is very awkward to stand (pegs too high), frames break at weak joint under rear of tank, and seat needs relpacement. I can tell you all the hot mods I've done/had them all. The Brits went nuts with these bikes I have the articles to prove it. I know anything you need to know about the TLR. I have many other bikes and this is still a top favorite. p.bowman@earthlink.net
  8. How did you post that pic with your reply? PB
  9. I have the 200 Long Ride (164cc or so) and love it. Not that great on gas, tho (it might be I need a tune up). No need the racing one, you're not going to need it. Handles great. Suspension is up to most anything too. Seat is surprisingly good, VERY good! Power is adequate but you have to sing it on some rad stuff (much better to use all the power on a light easy to handle bike than get into trouble with a heavier or more powerful bike!) Weight is magical and makes this bike so much fun you'll have a hard time stopping. There are other comparable bikes (I have them) like the TLR 200 and Rev 4 and CRF 100. The TLR 200 has the best power (my Rev 4 has a hitch above idle) and is the most dependable by a mile. CRF is another magical bike also. The complicated maintenence of the French Scorpa and Italian Beta make them regrettable choices in a sense (altho no regrets on the Scorpa for the Japanese motor and great qualities).
  10. When you do the carb you need to use compressed air AND small wire on the jets. Compressed air alone won't clean out the ethanol blockage that builds up. I cleaned jets twice and no luck until I used the wire (very small copper, won't damage jet innards). The Honda service dept. gave me the tip. Worked great 2 X. Make sure the float goes up and down easily without snagging on anything and then when its together warm it up and adjust the air screw very carefully (IF YOU CAN GET TO IT). That should get the tuning spot on.
  11. I have the book too. It's great; lotta info on Honda 4 stroke evolution.
  12. My honda dealership in Hawaii replaces them with those of a Honda VTR any year the USA part # is 51490-KBH-305.
  13. I have a Japan TLR 200 and a USA TLR 200 Reflex and they have different front brake hubs and backing plates.
  14. Mine broke in half right under the tank (a weak design flaw) and I added reinforcements (I recommend this) but I have not changed the head angle (but think it might be a good mod). You have to be careful this frame steel is very soft and flexible. BTW, how did lowering the pegs work? I can tell you many good mods for this bike.