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tahoebrian5

Zap Vs Double Blip

25 posts in this topic

hello

we try with my friend Panos to have a video with this 2 techniques .

I think the main deferens is

1 at db the moto hit on object like a hammer and the rider bend his knee with the forks(compress)

2 at jz the moto hit straight and the rider is going "in" the moto immediately after the first wheely .

any opinions will help us.....

thanks

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Thanks bestrial! Great video and the slow motion helps a lot. It seems to me that when doing the db, more emphasis is placed on the front when compressing the suspension and jumping, where as on the JZ most of the rider emphasis is jumping off the rear. I like how you are at a stop before doing the move, this keeps it nice and slow. Im going to go out and give it a try in a bit.

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had to watch that a few times to really pick up the differences kind of like one of those puzzles when you have 2 pictures that look the same and you have to find the differences... really good demonstration. Hopefully I can get out for a little practice tomorrow but it was -18 C today :(.

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Thanks bestrial! Great video and the slow motion helps a lot. It seems to me that when doing the db, more emphasis is placed on the front when compressing the suspension and jumping, where as on the JZ most of the rider emphasis is jumping off the rear. I like how you are at a stop before doing the move, this keeps it nice and slow. Im going to go out and give it a try in a bit.

Trouble is he did not hit the front tire low enough on the zap. The forced compression is the difference.

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After much debate, I've come up with the following. The 2 main techniques are the Roll up, and the Zap, both of which use a double blip as part of the process. While this may seem a trivial thing, it does help me think about things while I'm riding. If I think I can get the back to roll up an obstacle, there is no reason to attemp rear wheel lift other than training for a zap.

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You have to unload for every obstacle. Trials is all about body position. There is a couple crash vids just recently loaded on the front page. Almost all the crashes are from poor body position. Are you going to be able to make some events soon? Pitts trials club has a Ray Peters trials school on the calendar for July. He is a great teacher. Lucky for us he rides with our club now.

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Im planning on it. Id really like to accelerate my learning curve so events and training is my best bet. Doing my best in the mean time by getting familiar with the bike, and common techniques.. Even if I can't do em. Having a lot of trouble with good wheelie technique. I can get the front up and drop it where I want it, but balancing with the front in the air is eluding me. Last time out I was trying to wheelie while dragging my left foot. I'm going to try going in left circles next time. Maybe that will get me used to turning with the front up so I can do that instead of falling over. That and I realized I need a bit better clutch control so I can tread water while using holding pressure. I'm definitely learning something every time I go out but would be nice to have some experienced riders to help out.

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I'm not doing zaps yet but most of my training has been on figuring out when to just roll over or unweight the bike to get over something vs. when to double blip. I'm always surprised at how much the bike can actually get over by just simply rolling over it.

Check out all of this YouTube's channels videos if you haven't already, they are a must!

Edited by jml
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thanks JML, that video was the best yet at explaining what's going on with these techniques. I ride classic and post classic events and this will certainly help with my 1980's hondas, while not having the ZAP of modern bikes, I think practicing these will deffo improve my skill level.

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During a training session a few weeks ago I realized a great little practice for dumping the clutch to give a good zap... I was actually using it for doing splatters but find it can be fun for a lot of situations. Drive along in second gear at half throttle pull in the clutch all the way leaving the throttle at half throttle just coast along with the engine revving for a second or so then start your wheelie as you usually would bend knees compress fork on rebound the front wheel starts coming up then just let go of the clutch. If you use a kicker it helps your timing and with starting the wheelie and you get more lift. I never did get the double blip as my brain can't process 2 blips yet... but I felt this was a great start for getting used to the bike launching on command.

 

Caution - near the end of the day I was getting tired so my brain was fading I figured I would try this new trick to hop over a 2X4 on edge in a grassy field I came rolling up on it then compressed the front wheel just before the 2X4 and when the front wheel rebounded I tossed my whole body forward and upward to hop over the little obstacle... only problem was I forgot to tell my clutch finger the plan so the bike stayed put and I pulled just about every muscle in my body all at once         :chairfall:  :wall:   :beer: .

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