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Anything Interesting That You Have To Tell Us About The History About Your Bully?

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After the leaking cylinder cylinder liner saga on my model 92 I finally had it running well with the 627 Amal carb. I rode the bike for a few days, but I was constantly having to adjust the air screw and idle screw. She pulled very strong. Soon the noise started. Sounded faintly like piston slap. The more I rode the worse it got. O boy, here we go again, I thought. I figured the bore was getting wrecked again. Pulled the head and all looked fine. Ran her some more and the engine sounded really rattly. Next I put my ear to the engine and the noise seemed to be coming from the carb. Sure enough it was the Amal. The slide was rattling around and making a terrible racket. With the air box off I could touch the slide with my finger and the rattling would stop. Off with the Amal.

Received two carbs in the mail that Larry had tested for me. I was really looking forward to trying the 24 mikuni first. Installed the carb and it ran so fat that the bike looked like a mosquito fogger going up the driveway. Off with the 24, on with the 28. The 28 did the same thing. Sitting there, with oil running out of my freshly re packed mid box, I cannot figure why these carbs would run for Larry and not for me. Time for a phone call.

Talked to Larry for awhile and we are both scratching our heads. There is an elephant in the room that we don't see, he says. Turns out that elephant was there all along, but he looks a lot like a can of vp 110 race gas. I run race gas. Larry runs pump gas. Moved the needle to the leanest clip setting and she runs perfect. Had no idea the needle setting and race gas would have that much of an effect on one eighth to mid throttle input.

Tripp

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Well I guess there is nothing left to do but to tell off on myself again as apparently all is quiet out

there???

Received a present in the mail recently 20 years of twin shock 65/85 , lots of pictures, as I and my

riding buddies came from dirt bike backgrounds we wore lace up tall lines mans leather boots, needless to

say not to whippy for walking wet sections, so in looking at all the great pictures of the European riders

of that era reminded me of the hot setup for us, Genuine Dunlop Steel Toe/Steel Shank Trials Boots (so we

thought) now we know Fire Mans Boots, but at the time we were cool, nice & dry but boy, cold & could you

ever hurt yourself. Top off with a Belstaff jacket, no hat,(had hair then),now this came prior to our first

REAL TRIALS BIKE, and our waterproof riding jacket was an old hunting coat.

The first Bul in our little group, well worn M49 that we all loved, and that started the Love Affair.

Larry

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To add a little more on my first post when I bought my M199B Sherpa in about 2007 it still had the disc brakes on it that the first owner had put on the bike in about 1983. I still have the rear hub and disc and master cylinder for it. It had Talon hubs and very early Brembo single piston brakes. They kind of worked but they were very heavy as the discs where around 6 or 7 mm thick and about 160mm across. I put standard Sherpa T wheels and hubs on it when I bought it as over here twinshock bikes have to be air cooled, two shocks and have drum brakes. The standard brakes were about half the weight and stopped a lot better. I could also do nose wheelies again. Graham.

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Yes they were. The chrome on the liner was half gone and I had EBC brake shoes in it. I now have cast iron liners in each hub and they stop much better.

Those couldn't have been standard brakes :D

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My 199B had longer levers attached to the brake plates front and rear and they are made out of steel not aluminum. That combo works astonishing well when the chroming is still there. The chrome plating isn't bad either but you have to maintain aka clean the drum frequently from debris.

Edited by pschrauber
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Wish I could have seen a B model, they just weren't around here, so A model

is the latest & not to many of those, don't remember any 250's after Model 92

325's were here, (got to have a beast), they were & are arm pullers still

as compared to our 199's (different head design I guess) as the later bikes

seemed to be softer on the bottom but I think they would rev a little higher,

bore, stroke, piston same, (later 325 cases used a longer intake skirt).

Now we can use some of the Pursang pistons, ah the beauty of Bultaco engineering!!!

Larry

Edited by lbhbul
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[ attachment=14930:Picture0114151936_1.jpg]Just one of the girls standing out in the sun with nothing to do.

post-14329-0-64758500-1421540841_thumb.jpg

Edited by lbhbul
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Wish I could have seen a B model, they just weren't around here, so A model

is the latest & not to many of those, don't remember any 250's after Model 92

325's were here, (got to have a beast), they were & are arm pullers still

as compared to our 199's (different head design I guess) as the later bikes

seemed to be softer on the bottom but I think they would rev a little higher,

bore, stroke, piston same, (later 325 cases used a longer intake skirt).

Now we can use some of the Pursang pistons, ah the beauty of Bultaco engineering!!!

Larry

Yes the 199A gives you the feel to have the most power. At least in my personal experience. The 199b is more lazy in power output (in standard outfit with Femas rotor and big flywheel. I believe is Because of the heavier rotor. By using the flywheeel weight of the 250cc the engine rvs up much better. There a folks that have even lightened the rotor too but then the bike will takes ( with me on board) it's own way through the terrain.

I have seen some photos and even videos from 199b models in the US, so there must be at least some around. I have no idea how they went there?

You might have too look around in really long distances.

I got my Sherpa through an ad in a lokal Italian craiglist. And I looked around around from 2006 to 2010 to find a complete one ... I had fun some ad's but mostly the bike wasn't complete or the seller had very high expectations about the worth in money.

I even tried to get the bike of Fred Micheaud, but the seller then drew his ad back and denied the deal ... this was very sad ... I should have the photos left of this sadly not happens deal, (I can look them up and post them if there is someone interested). Anyway for the Sherpa I had to show up personal, which meant I had to drive 1500 km to get the bike. I did it, that was btw. really expensive but a kind of a short trip through the Alpes through Switzerland, using then the Bardolino Pass through Como and the pretty lakes there. Then a visit of Milano before going to Torino. After I bought the bike I reassembled it and stored it in the car. Then made a visit to Lingiotto in Turin, ( the famos house were there is a race and test road on the roof.

hen headed back. The bike hot completely ready now, its at the workshop now for getting road registered...

I believe to get a 199b you have to do some extra efforts

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Speaking of Model 92's that will pull your arms off, this one has a fresh lower end & second over bore.

It used to be mine but now belongs to my son, however dad is his mechanic.

and#160;

Edited by lbhbul
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You have done a nice job on those Sherpa T,s Larry.I had a 92 that I regret selling,but it didn,t look as nice as yours.I ,m not sure,but in the picture it looks like yours is minus the bottom frame rails and maybe has a plated finish.Is it a SM frame? I also like the truck in the first picture.I,ve been looking for one here but they,re always too rusted or they want crazy money for them.

Cheers, Scott

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Scott,

The Mod 92 does have Miller frame #29x, it was I think 1 of 3 around here in 1973 that broke the front down tube @ the lower

edge of the gusset, I traded a titanium rear axel for it, tubed inside & welded back, cut the gusset per factory spec. and off we go.

Had to do something to dampen the shaking engine (no head steady back then) so after engine mounts started cracking, added

a turn buckle from front head bolt to frame gusset, stopped that foolishness.

It lives @ my son's home now.

The old truck 75 3/4 Chev. bought new, bike hauler ect.

Larry

Edited by lbhbul
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Well I agree about the Miller pedal being not to whippy!
That is a Bull pedal with silly holes and chromed along with a stock M 92 swing arm (except shock mounts)
as when the broken frames were replaced the swing arms & brake pedals were not.

Larry

Edited by lbhbul

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Yes, A Lane Leavit special brake lever. I have a `73 SM high boy on my workbench at the moment. I was an Ossa lover, but have ridden other peoples T`s in several events. Was very curious as that is a good looking bike. You riding the western nationals?

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