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sammyd173

'breakthrough' Techniques

23 posts in this topic

Great stuff! At least once per event I miss a gate because I get confused. Closing your eyes and being able to complete the section mentally is a great idea.

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I might get better results if I closed my eyes.

 

Not so much a breakthrough, but don't overlook the value of being taught a technique. Learning from videos has it's limitations, it is far easier for someone to observe and instruct you.

I made far more progress in 3 hours at Bumpy than I did in maybe 10 sessions by myself.

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I might get better results if I closed my eyes.

 

Not so much a breakthrough, but don't overlook the value of being taught a technique. Learning from videos has it's limitations, it is far easier for someone to observe and instruct you.

I made far more progress in 3 hours at Bumpy than I did in maybe 10 sessions by myself.

 

I also find that setting up the GoPro and videoing my riding has helped me understand what my riding looks like off the bike, I can slow down the footage and really break down the mechanics of the technique and where I'm going wrong. This is a great tool that you and your coach can analyse after the fact. 

Edited by jml
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Floater turns. When the front wheel is up in the air, you can accelarate the rotation with a combination of pulling the bike closer to your body and the front wheel higher. Similarly you can slow down the floater by leaning back away from the bike and putting the front wheel lower. A bit like when you spun around on a tire swing as kid - lean back and legs out slows you down, etc.

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You've got to trust that the bike will grip, I often find myself dabbing when I don't need to because I'm nervous about going across a camber or turning down a steep slope. Speed up your frames per second in between sections by going a decent pace and it increases your reaction time in the sections, meaning you can adapt to rough terrain and make quicker direction changes. Keep the bike going, keep momentum and be determined not to put a foot down!

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My "breakthrough" moment was discovering how to wheelie.

I always used to try and "pull" the front up. bending my arms and in reality pulling myself towards the front, weighting it, and pushing the wheel landwards.

A tip I read or saw on line was to "push away" from the bars, thus pushing myself away from the front, unweighting it.

What a difference.

Sky high wheelies just like that.

 

Problem now is... as soon as I get it high, my natural reaction is to bend my arms and lean forward to stop myself falling off the back.

Natural self preservation.

Cannot break the habit.

Still trying though.

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When I do a slow full lock turn I turn my head far enough so I can see my rear fender, this brings around my shoulders and sticks my ass out the other side... the first time I did it I couldn't believe the difference it made, it was a real "aha" moment for me. It is always great when you are riding with a more advanced rider and they give you tips like that to help illustrate what you are doing wrong.

Great tip, tried it this afternoon!....along the lines 0f "look where you are going, not where you are".

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Use your knees to static balance. Bending your knees and squatting lower on the bike can stop it falling over. Also moving your knees from side to side across the tank is a great way to maintain balance, rather than using bar pressure.

 

I find that going up obstacles with the knees in tight works better than flaring your legs out. You might think that having your knees pointing way out gives more stability, like a tight rope walker holding a pole, but for me the effect is the opposite. If you go up something with your knees closer together, or ride in a straight line with them in, then it's easier to flick one out for balance. If both knees are already out you've limited your correction options. Try both next time out and see what works for you!

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