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iconic558

So Why Do I Always Put My Inside Foot Down?

21 posts in this topic

Try practising this for a few minutes before going out on the bike to practice slow tight turns and you will probably find them an absolute doddle after the guitar work .Regards.

No good for me sir as I play bass....I'll slap a few Mark Adams choons out and then jump on Speedy 'n see if the funk helps.

May the funk be with you.

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Try lifting your inside foot of the footrest when practising your turns.  This is almost how you need to be with all the weight on the outside footrest and your body and bike balanced.

Weight transfer on the footrest is good to practice as can be used to stand the bike up even in a straight line if it starts to slide. 

I found it easier and more balanced to lift a foot off the inside rather than pushing down on the outside but either works.

Try and keep your shoulders parallel to the bars when you turn rather than just lengthening and shortening you arms with elbow movement. If you sty parallel it helps push your weight out on a corner. 

Good luck

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You are not bending your knees and staying centered. On most bikes where you turn at speed the legs stay somewhat straight and you lean your body into the turn. New riders will keep that habit into their trials turns and it is incorrect. They will keep both legs the same length and try to compensate by twisting their butts which drops the inside shoulder and twists the body so the slightest pertubation causes the body to fall to the inside causing a dab. Try this exercise off the bike. Stand on a hill perpendicular to the fall line. Look at your legs. The uphill leg is bent more than the downhill leg. You are nice and stable and your center of mass is right between your feet. This is how a trials turn should feel. Now try to straighten the uphill leg. Your butt rotates to try and compensate and your position is much weaker. This is the mistake most riders make. Now get your bike and find a nice flat place to practice this. Bend your knees out and make figure eights while keeping your body between the contact patches of your wheels and your shoulders facing the front of the bike. Initiate and end turns with foot pressure. That is important. Stay centered and steer with foot pressure. When you get it right you'll find you can stop at any point in the turn and you will be balanced. Try it on a slight incline and the same rules apply. Stay centered and steer with foot pressure. You will also have to shift slightly forward and back as you transition uphill and downhill. Believe me you will absolutely feel it when you get it right. Keep those legs bent! Stay centered.

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.........Alli esta. Just like jimmyl said,just like Jordi says.
Excellent vid, shows just how exaggerated the body english is.

Thanks for help guys

Edited by iconic558
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Good video that.

It's difficult to explain to newcomers but that shows it well.

Cheers jimmy

Edited by jimmyl

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