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drca

Flat tight turns on loose dirt

13 posts in this topic

I've the basic full lock turn technique on hard grippy surface down, but on a slippery surface like hard pack dirt covered with loose dirt I keep getting into trouble with the front wheel pushing, sliding on the dirt, enlarging the turn.

So I am wondering what's the best technique:

  • keep the bike as straight as possible and lean it in the turn as far as possible?  Or anywhere in between.
  • Weight inside / outside peg? Inside / outside bar end?
  • Weight or un-weight the front wheel?
  • Anything else?

Thanks.

DC

 

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Posted (edited)

General principles:

Bike upright - use the steering lock to get round. Weight on outside footpeg. Pull upwards on inside bar end. Keep speed right down. Weight on front will help stop it washing out. Be as smooth as you can with clutch and throttle. Try it with knees together or splayed apart to get a feel for what works best. You'll probably find you develop a favoured side, ie turning left or right

Practice.

 

 

Edited by cleanorbust
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Minimum front brake, drag back if required. 

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40 minutes ago, b40rt said:

Minimum front brake, drag back if required. 

^^^This helps a lot ive recently found. Maybe not on slick mud though!? 

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Maybe my understanding was wrong! I thought for loose terrain you would weight the inside peg, lean the bike in, and lean your body out so that you can achieve the same turn radius with less handlebar turn, thus avoiding pushing the front along the ground and washing out.

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5 hours ago, jacob429 said:

Maybe my understanding was wrong! I thought for loose terrain you would weight the inside peg, lean the bike in, and lean your body out so that you can achieve the same turn radius with less handlebar turn, thus avoiding pushing the front along the ground and washing out.

What !

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I am a complete novice having only started a year ago, at the tender age of 63. I recently went to Inch perfect for a couple of days `Trials experience`. Best money I ever spent on anything trials related. I also struggle with loose surface or muddy tight turns. The instructor told me to lean more to the front of the bike as well as out to weight the front wheel, creating more grip on the front tyre. Seems to work for me.

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1 hour ago, b40rt said:

What !

 

Maybe my understanding was wrong! I thought for loose terrain you would weight the inside peg, lean the bike in, and lean your body out so that you can achieve the same turn radius with less handlebar turn, thus avoiding pushing the front along the ground and washing out.

 

Does that help?

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😵 No need to shout  young man.

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4 hours ago, turbofurball said:

 

 

Does that help?

I tried it both ways today, I have some sand and dry leaves in my back yard which are very easy to wash out in. My results are non-conclusive, I need to spend more time on it. Both seemed to be pretty decent, I think leaning the bike and counterweighting is easier for me since it's what I'm used to.

What I did learn though was it's much easier to find and keep my balance after a turn with the keeping the bike upright and weighting the outside peg. I will be turning like this from now on but will continue to try both ways in loose terrain and report back.

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2 hours ago, b40rt said:

😵 No need to shout  young man.

Lol! Didn't mean to shout, guess I'm too high strung. 

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I was having some of the same issue and found that some of my trouble was that my suspension wasn't setup well.  (Most of my trouble was me not doing it correctly.) What I ended up doing was to set the front and rear up to work together better and then it got easier to do without the front pushing as much. 

After the adjustment I found that doing it more like jacob429 was saying helped me.  :thumbup:

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