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Grovesy91

Hi all advice please

9 posts in this topic

Hi everyone 

Looking for some advice looking to get into trials riding as a complete novice at it. Have been road riding for a few years though. Have decided that I'd like to get a 250 having had a brief go on one. I have a budget of around £1500 for the bike itself. Is there any bikes in particular to look out for/any to avoid? Anything to look out for when buying one? Would be willing to go up in price if needed but hoping not to. Is there a big difference between the older bikes and newer? 

Also any other tips that may come in handy to a newbie with gear to get or anything else would be great 

Thanks

Edited by Grovesy91

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Hi Grovsey, You might just know that modern trials bikes have no seat, which for us elderly riders is a bit of a setback..

So you have to decide, either modern, and mix it with the bunny hoppers, or older Twin-shock and have a leasurely time in classic events.  Also you need to join a club, either ACU for modern or AMCA for Classic events.   The Manchester 17 Club runs some 'Dead Easy' trials, which are a good day out, with not too many points lost.   If you try the harder events, you will end the day with a cricket score.

I ride both modern and twinshock bikes, and am doing up a 1959 Greeves Scottish, which I am not looking forward to riding, as it is very heavy especially around the front end, and won't do half as many tricks as the modern bikes.

.

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I personally would shoot for a sherco between 2003 and 2008 for that budget, 250 or 290.The gearbox's are pretty much bomb proof from what I've heard.I only say that becasue ive only ever had Shercos and Fantics and i can speak from experience.

If you have a friend who already rides trials or has some good mechanical knowledge, take them along to see and hear the bike you want to buy. 

It would be great if you could actually have a ride of few peoples bikes at a trial but youre a complete novice so it may not work ha 

If you get a decent pair of boots thats good, you may never have to buy another for 10 years if you look after a good quality pair.

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11 hours ago, scifi said:

If you try the harder events, you will end the day with a cricket score.

.

Not the way I play cricket!

I can definitely score higher in a trial than a cricket match. :(

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Hi guys

Thanks for the replies, currently looking at a 2003 sherc. Anything to look out for on these models and will they bee more than enough for a beginner? Yet to start looking at clothing and boots too much but any brands to avoid?

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Hello grovesy91 & welcome to the world of trials. Warning though it’s somewhat addictive !

The first advice I’d give a newcomer is to go to a local trial where there’s a beginners/easy course running, and have a look at what the sections are like. Get there in good time & talk to as many people as you can before the start. They are on the whole a friendly bunch , & will all be standing around nattering half an hour before start time anyway and you might pick up some good local info, maybe you’ll find some secondhand gear for sale or even a bike !

Secondly about the bike. Your budget should get you a tidy machine to start out on. 125cc would be ok but need more revving, 250 is probably better (and 125’s tend to have been revved by junior riders), bigger than that might be a handful, but don’t rule anything out, they’re all ok. Anything around 2003 onwards is plenty competitive enough (beta rev 3, Sherco, gas gas pro, etc) and although newer is generally an improvement it won’t make too much difference at beginner level. Don’t know what your mechanic skills are like, but look for something well looked after. That usually means it will look clean for starters, then check basics like chain & sprockets, wheel bearings, rims for straight & true without spokes bent/missing, steering head bearings, tyre condition, and general condition of plastics & painted parts for signs of hard use. Bearings are generally just a few quid to replace, a pair of tyres will add 160 to your costs,  plastics can be astronomically expensive so check they’re in one piece. Well looked after bikes might have some scratches & some stickers missing etc from the nature of the game, but will be fully functional, with any wearing parts replaced as required.

Thirdly, once you get a steed, get out and ride it ! Even if you can’t get to some proper off road area just practice figure of 8’s on the garden/drive at low speed & full lock, then you can throw in maybe a length of timber / breeze block / or even a ladder to ride across or over. It all helps. 

Then go out & try a trial, don’t put off the competition element because that really is the best way to learn & improve. You’ll get lots of help & encouragement from other riders.

Finally just be aware that there are thieves out there who like off road bikes, so keep it locked & if possible don’t advertise its existence to all who pass by your house or storage place.

Good luck and above all enjoy it. It’s great fun, good social, and a surprisingly good workout.

 

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There's a trial on at Birdlip Quarry this Sunday, just down the road from you - I'll be there, and the Zona 1 peeps are very friendly and welcoming.  You could come along and have a look, see what others are riding (be sure to wrap up well though!)

Birdlip is their practice space, with a full membership you can ride there any time as long as you're not alone - it's a fab space :)

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Hi guys thank you again for all the useful comments. I've now managed to kit myself out and also got a 2006 sherco 250. Turbofurball I did pop up to zona already had intention of joining. So managed to join up Saturday then went up on the Sunday got to see some trial action then got out for a good bit of practice for a couple of hours. Seems a great place to be 

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It really is, me and my other half had a blast there - you should have said hello!

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