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mcman56

TY175 Progressive Clutch?

16 posts in this topic

Is there a way to make the TY175 clutch more progressive?  I have the clutch extender and put in some heavier oil such that it drags until warmed up.  Those two things helped but I'm wondering if there is anything else. 

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Do you slip the clutch much?  I just stick it in gear and use the throttle for the rest

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I don´t know anything about Yamaha clutches but generally speaking: Clutch centre and clutch basket must not be notched and clutch plates must be in good condition.

I think thin oil is better than thick oil. I use engine oil 0W-20 to get a drag free clutch

Carl

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Ty175 can suffer from a pitted/worn surface on the camshaft which could cause it to engage more suddenly than normal. The pit forms where the pushrod rubs on it.

I agree with Carl Ekblom that the condition of the plate driving surfaces on the basket and hub are very important for progressive engagement and is probably the most common cause of poor engagement and disengagement on TY175 clutches

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If you need to use the clutch on a section then you are in the wrong gear. This was the biggest lesson I learned with twinshocks.  

I don't touch the clutch now 

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I know I should not say that but the clutch is such a good friend in some situation.

Guy

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On 13/02/2018 at 2:08 AM, mcman56 said:

Is there a way to make the TY175 clutch more progressive?  I have the clutch extender and put in some heavier oil such that it drags until warmed up.  Those two things helped but I'm wondering if there is anything else. 

The clutch on a TY 175 should be nice and light with a smooth take up. Too thick an oil will cause more issues, follow Carl Eckbloms suggestion for oil grade. A good look at all the parts of the clutch including checks for buckling etc and careful assembly following a manual should produce a more effective operating clutch for you. Clutchless gear changes should be ok on the TY if you are sensible about it. TY guy has the right method, clutch is for emergency only in section, assuming you are in the right gear!

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I am used to a modern bike.  When I ride a TY, I try to ride clutch out.  Occasionally, a turn is so tight I pull in the clutch to be able to go slow enough to make it or maybe hesitate before continuing.  When I go to let it out, it tends to abrupt at the almost zero speed I'm going.  It is probably by design but I was wondering if there was a way to improve.  I have the smallest front sprocket (11?) and the stock size rear sprocket.  

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It sounds like you are trying to turn like you were still on a modern bike, and it isn't a modern bike. The techniques required are quite different.

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Learning to use the clutch in sections gives you an advantage. There are many sections where there is no "right" gear, slippery conditions, or a tight turn onto a steep climb etc. Persevere with getting the clutch right, it will make you a better rider.

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FWIW, despite my flippant first reply, my clutch is smooth as so I suspect you need to give yours some attention.  I just threw normal 10w40 oil in last time I changed it.

I have a modern steering angle on mine, too, which might give an advantage on tight turns (?) thinking about it I've only really slipped it at all when on full lock and below comfortable tickover engine speed.  I have a 12t front sprocket and ride 95% of the time in 2nd gear.

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You should also have a look at your cable and it's routing, I know they are different, but the clutch on my TY 250 is smooth and predictable. I change the cable and keep it well lubricated, I also use a longer lever. It is very light to a point that some of my friend thought I ad taken spring out.

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Had a sticky cable on one of my bikes, and rather than get a new (expensive.) cable, I decided to try oiling what I had.

I put the nipple end into a drill chuck and span the inner cable slowly, whilst dripping diesel into the other end.  It took a lot of time and about 5 teaspoons of diesel before anything emerged from the bottom  end.   The first drips where really black, but after a few tries the diesel would pour easily down the cable.   Then I put some normal oil down the top, and the cable was really free then.

Hope this helps...

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A quicker method is to use a cable oiler (£4 or so off of a certain online auction site), and blast WD40 through - takes a minute or so.  IIRC Venhill recommend re-oiling after every jet wash (!)

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I have a new cable and it is not sticky.  The pull is relatively easy.  When you let the clutch out, there is not much lever travel between start of engagement and full engagement so it is hard to slip the clutch.  So, I guess I'm asking if it could be made more like a modern bike clutch.  

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