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Has anyone gone from 24v to 36v ?

My son is 8 and has been riding his 16.0 24v for more then 2 years. He rides well but finds it hard to lift the front wheel.

Does the 36v. have much more torque making it easier to lift the front wheel ?

Thanks.

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Assuming noise is not a problem, maybe 8 years old is time to switch to petrol, not up the voltage?

24V is 600 Watt and weighs 59 lbs

36V is 750 Watt and weighs 62 lbs

Lifting front wheel is more to do with suspension characteristics and rider technique than it is with power

I don't know what Watts (maybe 5000 to 6000) my sons Gasgas 50 boy is but its way quicker than either 24 or 36V.

Cheers

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My son weighs about 50 lbs, and his 36V can not lift the front with motor alone. The kid has to learn proper body movement to do a wheelie.

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Assuming noise is not a problem, maybe 8 years old is time to switch to petrol, not up the voltage?

24V is 600 Watt and weighs 59 lbs

36V is 750 Watt and weighs 62 lbs

Lifting front wheel is more to do with suspension characteristics and rider technique than it is with power

I don't know what Watts (maybe 5000 to 6000) my sons Gasgas 50 boy is but its way quicker than either 24 or 36V.

Cheers

I very much doubt that a GG 50 boy is 5-6kw more like 2-3kw and that would be peak power, ( A older Beta rev3 270 only peaked at around 12-14kw ) normal riding power would be around 500-750w, 750W on a small bike for a small rider should be more than enough to pull power wheelies as long as the bike is geared right, but 62lbs is very heavy for such a small low voltage bike . My suggestion would be to change the battery chemistry to a much lighter one and up the current limit on the speed controller ( as long as you are happy with the top speed of the bike ) this will help a lot.

Edit : Or for a very quick/cheap looksy if you do not mind losing a bit off the top speed gear it down a tad maybe 1 tooth of the front sprocket or a 4-5tooth larger sprocket on the back.

Edited by gwhy

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I also think it has more to do with with suspension characteristics and rider technique than it is with power.

I think the front fork is too stiff for his weight. He can't compress it with the bike static.

Has anyone tried to open the Forks ? Two third of their length is empty, so I am wandering if they have any springs ?! Maybe elastomers ?

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Yes I've opened up the forks on my son's 2009 36V Oset-16. They are terrible. Yes there is a spring inside, but it is very stiff. I went to the hardware store and bought a bunch of different springs, and then played with mixing-and-matching springs until I got the forks to compress reasonably when the bike hits big bumps. Unfortunately internal construction is so poor and clearances are so huge that there is a lot of stiction and binding. I sprayed internals with light oil, and it helps a little, but the right "fix" is to replace them with better forks. A friend of mine replaced them with RST Kappa T9 20" mountain bike forks. I think the latest-and-greatest "Pro" Osets use this fork, or maybe I'm thinking about Oliver's personal bike.

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RST Kappa T9 20"

Trying to show my kids how to go over a rock on the newer 36V, I bent the RST forks at the tube, and also bent the top clamp (not shure if it is named a "triple" clamp since the tubes do not go through). The replacement forks from OSET look the same and are also from RST but say "RST CAPA20". To be honest, the old gray forks seemed stonger provided you did not break the white plastic, and with the ACE Hardware springs that were recommended on this forum but on another thread, all I had to do was cut them to size, and the old forks, I think, work as good or better; however, the stearing head height is different, so I could not use them (they are about half the price). Mind you that I greased all the old fork moving parts to minimize stickiness. The newer forks, I was able to adjust stiffness by cutting the spring and manipulating the internal spacers, all in conjunction with keeping in mind what the adjustment knob can do.

Bolt cutters were handy.

The rock was a little bigger than this one:

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