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adam1

How to tame a 2005 250!

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Hi all,

Before you all shout at once yes i am a Beta owner but my mate is a sherco owner and has asked me to ask a quick question. He owns a 2005 250 and tbh it is a little aggressive to say the least like a angry wasp on real bad day. As he is only a beginner like myself finds it quite difficult to control on technical stuff but very good on hill climbs etc( but does loop it now and again), when he rides my rev 3 he does a fair bit better on the technical stuff as my rev 3 is easier to ride/control.

What would be a solution, Gearing? slow action throttle? Any help from you sherco owners would be appreciated

Cheers Adam

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Retard !...

...the ignition :lol:

Do a search in the Sherco forum..Copemech has the best guide.

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Try the smoothing it our forum within Sherco forums.

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I have PM'd Mark (copemech) cheers for the heads up :thumbup:

Adam

P.s whats the standard gears (front and rear)on the 2005 250 sherco

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fit a slow action throttle,and retard the ignition.still to wild for him fit 3 base gaskets. tames it down like a 200. front 10t rear 42t.

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I have PM'd Mark (copemech) cheers for the heads up :thumbup:

Adam

P.s whats the standard gears (front and rear)on the 2005 250 sherco

10x42 on 2003 models. Sure '05 will be the same, just '03 is the only figures I had to hand.

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I've got an 02 290 which was quite agreesive when I got it. It had the fast action throttle on it. I replaced this with a slow action throttle which made a difference. However the best thing I did was go down to 9 teeth on the front sprocket from a ten, best

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Got an 08 sherco250 and was finding the same problem with bike, it seemed that when i was trying to turn a tight turn at low speed i only had to touch the throttle and if wheel was turned it would push through corners instead of riding them resulting in off balance and dropping silly points,so as only just started novice myself i got talking to a few riders and got advised to try a slow action throttle untill you learn to ride sections and control and balance,( all the things i need to learn..or that could be the cider the night before!!!!!) and did my first trial with it yesterday and it made riding alot more controlled and comfortable and found got better with it as trial went on....really enjoyed the day instead of getting annoyed at silly mistakes so i'd try that first and see how he gets on, as they say try 1 thing at a time and then fine tune.....

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Sorry Adam, got your PM late so might as well just post here.

I had an '05 2.5 and it was a quick bike, yet my fondest after a bit of settling.

For a novice rider, I think the slow throttle best. I would slow the timing by 3-4mm on the plate from standard.

If you need more, I still reccomend trying the Boyesen reeds (665 dual stage) for their smoothing effect, prior to tearing the top end off to stack gaskets, and because I am lazy!

Chewy had good results with these as well, however he did retain the stock reed stops, which I have not tried. The Tryals Shop in the US had some #665 reeds in their sale list(listed as Beta Techno) for $20, which is cheap as post should not bee too much on them.

I do not normally recco changing the gearing from standard 10/42 combo, but if one just must, a change to a 44 rear is a much more acceptable and only half the total ratio change as compared to dropping to the 9T front which just seems to slow the bike too much. It does narrow that large gap between 3rd and 4th gear though.

Mind you, with all this there is a difference between a slow throttle, and "slowing" the bikes reaction to a given amount of throttle input. Developing a good feel for clutch slippage and finding traction is just as important as anything. A reduction in gearing acts as a torque multiplier, yet lessens the distance the bike travels at a given rpm and gear. Personally, I like the reaction a bit slower and smoother, thus the timing and the reeds. I still run the quicker throttle, which allows me to open it up into the bigger power quicker if needed, as my old wrist only works so well. But that is another story! I still highly suggest to many new riders to ride up a gear whilst "forcing" one to learn the clutch and searching for traction and feel, reguardless of rpm. Find you a slick grassy knoll and practice application of power via the clutch, just takes time.

As always, you just gotta try to suit! :rolleyes:

Edited by copemech

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Sorry Adam, got your PM late so might as well just post here.

I had an '05 2.5 and it was a quick bike, yet my fondest after a bit of settling.

For a novice rider, I think the slow throttle best. I would slow the timing by 3-4mm on the plate from standard.

If you need more, I still reccomend trying the Boyesen reeds (665 dual stage) for their smoothing effect, prior to tearing the top end off to stack gaskets, and because I am lazy!

Chewy had good results with these as well, however he did retain the stock reed stops, which I have not tried. The Tryals Shop in the US had some #665 reeds in their sale list(listed as Beta Techno) for $20, which is cheap as post should not bee too much on them.

I do not normally recco changing the gearing from standard 10/42 combo, but if one just must, a change to a 44 rear is a much more acceptable and only half the total ratio change as compared to dropping to the 9T front which just seems to slow the bike too much. It does narrow that large gap between 3rd and 4th gear though.

Mind you, with all this there is a difference between a slow throttle, and "slowing" the bikes reaction to a given amount of throttle input. Developing a good feel for clutch slippage and finding traction is just as important as anything. A reduction in gearing acts as a torque multiplier, yet lessens the distance the bike travels at a given rpm and gear. Personally, I like the reaction a bit slower and smoother, thus the timing and the reeds. I still run the quicker throttle, which allows me to open it up into the bigger power quicker if needed, as my old wrist only works so well. But that is another story! I still highly suggest to many new riders to ride up a gear whilst "forcing" one to learn the clutch and searching for traction and feel, reguardless of rpm. Find you a slick grassy knoll and practice application of power via the clutch, just takes time.

As always, you just gotta try to suit! :rolleyes:

So mark, you reckon changing to a slow action throttle is the key to start with? or should he keep the throttle the same as he doesnt mind the power when he needs it ie hill climbs and retard the Ignition, if so could you send me some info on how to do the retard mod as we have never taken the fly wheel off or altered the ignition

Cheers Adam

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Slow throttle is the best if you're uncomfortable with changing the timing.

The conventional wisdom was (maybe still is) that the entire range of timing adjustment is useable, and anywhere in that range can be set according to your preference without fear of damaging your engine.

Not necessarily so.

I once retarded the timing on my '01 290 and the bike ran so hot that the plastic near the muffler began to melt...so taking small steps is best.

BTW...no puller is needed for this.

Just slack the screws and turn the plate.

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So mark, you reckon changing to a slow action throttle is the key to start with? or should he keep the throttle the same as he doesnt mind the power when he needs it ie hill climbs and retard the Ignition, if so could you send me some info on how to do the retard mod as we have never taken the fly wheel off or altered the ignition

Cheers Adam

Yea, always start off slow. There is not really that much difference, and he will go at his own pace on things later.

I have no Idea what Charlie is rattling about! You woulsd need a flywheel puller, and preferably a rattlegun to do the timing mod, but first things first, and or do the reeds next then see where he is at, as he may not want to go further, just depends? :rolleyes:

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Yea, always start off slow. There is not really that much difference, and he will go at his own pace on things later.

I have no Idea what Charlie is rattling about! You woulsd need a flywheel puller, and preferably a rattlegun to do the timing mod, but first things first, and or do the reeds next then see where he is at, as he may not want to go further, just depends? :rolleyes:

Sorry Mark i might be being THICK but are you saying just change to a slow action throttle and see what that does? I have read some where else not sure where and it said the best option was normal throttle and retard ignition(saves twisting your wrist as much). I am going to go with what you suggest.

cheers

Adam

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