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laird387

TWINSHOCKS ARE A'COMING............

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On 1/7/2017 at 1:05 PM, laird387 said:

Your thoughts, fourex, prompt me to ask several questions:

1.      Did the same models of Spanish marques always be exported to Australia, the States and Europe simultaneously?

2.      How did the point at which any models turned from '74, say to '75 compare to the actual calendar New Year?

Whatever the answers, here is Malcom Rathmell in the same trial, also with the clutch lever arm on the top of the casing............

Enjoy 

'0-1-Malcolm Rathmell.1.jpg-1.jpg

I don't think this is 1974 as that's a 348 montesa which first appeared in 1976

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On 1/7/2017 at 11:24 AM, laird387 said:

OK you win - how about this photo taken at the 1974 Eboracum Colonial trial?

 

Enjoy

'0-1-74montesa.png

This can't be 1974 as that's at least a 1975 bike, looks like a UKR250 lacking stickers. I also doubt it's the same trial as the Rathmell picture, looks a tad milder.

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On 1/8/2017 at 3:27 PM, laird387 said:

Hi pschrauber,

I was an active photographer from 1950 onwards, so had to learn how to use film and also how to develop and print them for myself.

My comment was that ACTION photos are likely to have been in b/w, simply because the color film was so slow that you could not 'stop' the action.  I was doing still shots of machines for catalogues, etc., in color from about 1966, so 'posed' photos for magazines would often be in colour - that would be where your 'special edition' issues would come from.

Anyway, here is another Cota for you, Rob Edwards in action in the 1974 Eboracum Colonial trial.

Enjoy,

'0-1-Nil.Colonial.74 (8) copy-1.jpg

Again not 74 as it's a 348, earliest it can be is pre production bikes in 1975, more likely 1976 but you'd best ask Rob Edwards.

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Rob Edwards & Malcom Rathmell bikes are pre production bikes using 247 parts round forks and wheels ,note  angle of rear shocks and both bikes right hand gear change brake arm left hand side of hub , production bikes had square fork bottoms and a cone shape rear wheel with brake arm on right side of hub  and left hand gear change  

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On 1/8/2017 at 2:34 PM, laird387 said:

Sorry, pschrauber, most action photography of that period was still black/white so I can't be sure if this Cota is one of the ones that you like - but the image comes from my book of the Scott Trial History which is being serialised in our digital magazine, ORRe, shortly.

 

Enjoy

'0-1-2015-11-17_13 copy-1.jpg

 

On 1/8/2017 at 2:44 PM, pschrauber said:

That is the complete red Cota 242. Very good to see btw. and

Thank You very much!

To B/W colored photos our Trialsport Magazine turned in color first in the mid of 2000 to 2010 when I remember right ... at least everything published decades before 2000 is black in white beside some special issues like number 200 and number 300 these where partial with color pics. So no problem with B/W that was standard back then.

Montesa 304 monoshock, no rear shocks but the big give away is the hydraulic front brake. I might be wrong but I don't think there was any red tank 242's brought into the UK, the Yam TY mono had killed off the twin shock market & Sandifords sold off their 242 stock cheap.

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Now I need a set of honest answers, it is abundantly obvious that I personally was not particularly interested in the 'current' crop of machines in the 1970s, mainly because in 1972 I had organised the first ever trial in the series that were to become known as the 'pre-65' trials, then promptly was inveigled into organising a national series of similar trials that eventually we developed into the Sammy Miller series, in other words virtually every weekend was occupied in the classic scene.

But my archive still grew steadily full of images that were not personally all that interesting to me.

That archive is still there and could still be made available for all to see - but sadly I get irritated by all the implied criticism that I haven't got a clue and need constant correction - I know I'm not vitally interested in the minor technical variances between the different models - but surely there are people out there who enjoy being able to see actual action photos from that period.

So now I need to know - do I bother to keep trying to put interesting photos up for discussion - or should I concentrate exclusively on those models that I have personal knowledge of ????????

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12 hours ago, perce said:

 

Montesa 304 monoshock, no rear shocks but the big give away is the hydraulic front brake. I might be wrong but I don't think there was any red tank 242's brought into the UK, the Yam TY mono had killed off the twin shock market & Sandifords sold off their 242 stock cheap.

Yes You are right, it's the monochoque and with front disc brake fitted 304. Good eye's.

The 304 is nice too and I rode one in 1986 very similar to the 242 beside the better front brake and the rear shock setup. I has my best results in trials on 1986 ...

To the red 242 the model was even sold in two color schemes with white gas tank and with red gas tank. The red one wasn't sold very much but "survived" for the 304.

PS:

I just acquired a 242 in super nice state and original a 1984 MKII model. I too fitted it with the red gas tank and seat combo I found abroad as I like that look so much more and the gas tank is made out of PE so no cracks or leaks or difficulties with our gasoline for future riding.

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1 hour ago, laird387 said:

Now I need a set of honest answers, it is abundantly obvious that I personally was not particularly interested in the 'current' crop of machines in the 1970s, mainly because in 1972 I had organised the first ever trial in the series that were to become known as the 'pre-65' trials, then promptly was inveigled into organising a national series of similar trials that eventually we developed into the Sammy Miller series, in other words virtually every weekend was occupied in the classic scene.

But my archive still grew steadily full of images that were not personally all that interesting to me.

That archive is still there and could still be made available for all to see - but sadly I get irritated by all the implied criticism that I haven't got a clue and need constant correction - I know I'm not vitally interested in the minor technical variances between the different models - but surely there are people out there who enjoy being able to see actual action photos from that period.

So now I need to know - do I bother to keep trying to put interesting photos up for discussion - or should I concentrate exclusively on those models that I have personal knowledge of ????????

In my personal view it's up to the photo the knowledge about a bike or a rider is irrelevant when you look at a photo all what matters is the shot or capture. The right moment of movement or calmness the failure or the win how all is situated where on the photo, that is the spice in photography that's why photography still matters.

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1 hour ago, laird387 said:

Now I need a set of honest answers, it is abundantly obvious that I personally was not particularly interested in the 'current' crop of machines in the 1970s, mainly because in 1972 I had organised the first ever trial in the series that were to become known as the 'pre-65' trials, then promptly was inveigled into organising a national series of similar trials that eventually we developed into the Sammy Miller series, in other words virtually every weekend was occupied in the classic scene.

But my archive still grew steadily full of images that were not personally all that interesting to me.

That archive is still there and could still be made available for all to see - but sadly I get irritated by all the implied criticism that I haven't got a clue and need constant correction - I know I'm not vitally interested in the minor technical variances between the different models - but surely there are people out there who enjoy being able to see actual action photos from that period.

So now I need to know - do I bother to keep trying to put interesting photos up for discussion - or should I concentrate exclusively on those models that I have personal knowledge of ????????

Deryk 

Keep on trying with interesting photos please, I don't think it's personal when people correct or flex their knowledge, just fellow anoraks enjoying a look at some great pictures. The forum itself serves as an archive and knowledge repository so it all adds value to our sport and hobby.

 

Keep 'em coming!

Edited by bothfeetdown
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2 hours ago, laird387 said:

Now I need a set of honest answers, it is abundantly obvious that I personally was not particularly interested in the 'current' crop of machines in the 1970s, mainly because in 1972 I had organised the first ever trial in the series that were to become known as the 'pre-65' trials, then promptly was inveigled into organising a national series of similar trials that eventually we developed into the Sammy Miller series, in other words virtually every weekend was occupied in the classic scene.

But my archive still grew steadily full of images that were not personally all that interesting to me.

That archive is still there and could still be made available for all to see - but sadly I get irritated by all the implied criticism that I haven't got a clue and need constant correction - I know I'm not vitally interested in the minor technical variances between the different models - but surely there are people out there who enjoy being able to see actual action photos from that period.

So now I need to know - do I bother to keep trying to put interesting photos up for discussion - or should I concentrate exclusively on those models that I have personal knowledge of ????????

If it's got two wheels and knobbly tyres, it's interesting. Keep the photos coming, whatever the era. I've not noticed any "implied criticism" so perhaps you're being a little over-sensitive (this is not meant to imply criticism :)). I rather like your "Here's an interesting photo. Dust off your anorak and tell me about it" posts.

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5 hours ago, laird387 said:

Now I need a set of honest answers, it is abundantly obvious that I personally was not particularly interested in the 'current' crop of machines in the 1970s, mainly because in 1972 I had organised the first ever trial in the series that were to become known as the 'pre-65' trials, then promptly was inveigled into organising a national series of similar trials that eventually we developed into the Sammy Miller series, in other words virtually every weekend was occupied in the classic scene.

But my archive still grew steadily full of images that were not personally all that interesting to me.

That archive is still there and could still be made available for all to see - but sadly I get irritated by all the implied criticism that I haven't got a clue and need constant correction - I know I'm not vitally interested in the minor technical variances between the different models - but surely there are people out there who enjoy being able to see actual action photos from that period.

So now I need to know - do I bother to keep trying to put interesting photos up for discussion - or should I concentrate exclusively on those models that I have personal knowledge of ????????

Yes, yes, yes p!ease do keep posting shots from the 70s. This is an era I can personally relate to and it's great to see shots which haven't appeared before. I have responded to previous posts but certainly not intended any criticism  - do keep them coming, the challenge of identifying this rider or that bike is always enjoyable and appreciated.

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3 hours ago, laird387 said:

Keep 'em coming, bothfeetdown said, so here's a technical question.

Is this what they mean by LAID DOWN SHOCKS

Enjoy.

'0-1-Nil.Colonial.74 (4).jpg

Well, identification of this rider is awkward but contrary to first impressions the photo actually shows some good riding - he's obviously made an all-out attempt to clear the ends cards with his front spindle while keeping his feet glued to the rests.

Edited by cleanorbust

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18 minutes ago, cleanorbust said:

Yes, yes, yes p!ease do keep posting shots from the 70s. This is an era I can personally relate to and it's great to see shots which haven't appeared before. I have responded to previous posts but certainly not intended any criticism  - do keep them coming, the challenge of identifying this rider or that bike is always enjoyable and appreciated.

Hi cleanorbust, try the 'Dust off your anorak....' postings, there are just over 1800 images in that particular unidentified pile, so I shall be busy putting them out for public scrutiny whenever I have spare minutes.............

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6 minutes ago, laird387 said:

Hi cleanorbust, try the 'Dust off your anorak....' postings, there are just over 1800 images in that particular unidentified pile, so I shall be busy putting them out for public scrutiny whenever I have spare minutes.............

Good news!

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