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512high

FIGURE 8...IS THIS RIGHT?

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I guess this isn't really a Montesa question in general. I have a 06' Montesa 4RT, I am a beginner, started to do figure 8, using two flags, as I get better will move them closer, my question is this, where the bike idles high, I have my index finger on clutch and front brake, as I go through my process, all I have been doing is using the clutch and front break a tad, NOT USING THROTTLE, is this correct? Or should I be using throttle?

 

Thanks

 

Philip

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1 hour ago, blocky said:

Leave the front brake alone and use the rear brake

understood on front brake,,, but what about throttle? I'm on level ground learning.., 

 

thanks for the quick replies everyone

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I don't need throttle when doing it on flat ground with my 4RT but have found some when doing the figure 8's on a hill can some times be helpful (depending on the hill).  

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Not sure if this applies to this model but later 4rts, it is quite usual to fit a 9 front sprocket which slows bike down and may assist you..

 

 

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The point of the exercise is to use all the controls. Front brake makes the bike want to stand up. Back brake wants to pull the bike down. Practice working clutch against back brake for smoothness. Work clutch against front brake for recovering balance. Same for thottle. I understand the idle tends to run high on a 4rt but you want to get used to working all the controls against each other so I'd slow the idle for practice.

There is no right or wrong technique. You are trying to build a set of conditioned responses so the more varied techniques  you practice the better you'll handle the unexpected.

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I wouldn't recommend slowing down the idle on a 4RT you will likely cause yourself stalling and starting issues.  However the 9 tooth front recommendation should create an affect that will slow the bike down for doing everything Dan indicated without the adverse affects of lowering the idle.

My 2 cents and experience.  

I agree with everything else Dan said, its about getting varied conditions and practice to be the best rider you can!

Edited by jonnyc21
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use the clutch and rear brake just like you d be shown if doing the cbt.  do it all day long till you can do it without thinking..

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you probably dont need any brake at all after while! I use front brake only! and only for quick recovery if I overdue the clutch every now and then.  The most important part of figure 8 is body position... focus on that.  Lean that bike as far as you can and try to touch the outside foot on the side of the peg. That and positioning your body as far back as possible will make for nice quick full lock turns

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4 hours ago, leosantanalg said:

you probably dont need any brake at all after while! I use front brake only! and only for quick recovery if I overdue the clutch every now and then.  The most important part of figure 8 is body position... focus on that.  Lean that bike as far as you can and try to touch the outside foot on the side of the peg. That and positioning your body as far back as possible will make for nice quick full lock turns

Just learned I've been doing it wrong for decades ....

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Slightly off topic, but if you have ever ridden down some of the continental hills with lots of corners on a push-bike, you soon learn that the entry to the corner should be done with the front brake, and the corner and exit with the rear brake.   This is because the front brake is most efficient, but will cause your front wheel to step out... widening the corner.  Whereas the rear brake makes the rear wheel semi-slide and causes you to steepen the turn radius...  Which is good if you want to avoid going over the Armco.

.Have fun and ride as many real trials as possible..

 

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11 hours ago, scifi said:

Slightly off topic, but if you have ever ridden down some of the continental hills with lots of corners on a push-bike, you soon learn that the entry to the corner should be done with the front brake, and the corner and exit with the rear brake.   This is because the front brake is most efficient, but will cause your front wheel to step out... widening the corner.  Whereas the rear brake makes the rear wheel semi-slide and causes you to steepen the turn radius...  Which is good if you want to avoid going over the Armco.

.Have fun and ride as many real trials as possible..

 

not sure that you can use Nibali's techniques to slow figures of 8 but there you go.

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