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walz

Brake line Splitter? One brake for both wheels

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I take the point about modulating a foot brake. What with a stiff boot and a stiff sole, it’s hard to know if you’re on the pedal, let alone how hard you’re pushing it. I’ve thought about the problem a lot and finally concluded the  solution is to grow an extra hand. Unfortunately there is one flaw.

Edited by trapezeartist

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I see a few comments about the Clake and think that might be a good option but it would take some brain re-training for sure.  

 

Video:

 

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On 9/26/2019 at 10:40 AM, walz said:

I thought of one problem: using throttle and front brake to lift rear wheel. Still curious to try. Let the flogging start:

There is a solution for you if you struggle with rear brake modulation!  its a clake pro lever which will combine rear brake and clutch in one single lever. everyone will say bad things about but believe me: The trials community is just very close minded! if no pro rider uses, it must suck, right???  I used for while to develop rear brake timing and was amazing. when tuned correctly will allow you to understand better the use of rear brake ( a must have skill). you can see it in use in my instagram and fb  @leoslg and trials vlogger 

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6 hours ago, leosantanalg said:

: The trials community is just very close minded! if no pro rider uses, it must suck, right??? 

Your right, it must suck ! ?

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On 9/26/2019 at 7:25 PM, feetupfun said:

There's a thing called a Clake that uses the left bar lever as a clutch and rear brake that might interest you.

I've also often thought that mountain bikes and electric trials bikes with the rear brake on the left handlebar lever had a slight advantage for bike control compared with using one of your feet for the rear brake.

As for the having the brakes both work off one lever, it would be a significant handicap when riding trials because the reason they are independent is to provide better bike control. From the sound of your question I'd say that when you have had some more trials riding experience you will appreciate why the brakes are independent.

Clake works great and will teach you a lot about your timing specially for stationary zaps and rear wheel hops! definitely is not a solution and you will have to develop a rear break skills for your foot in the future but i seriously advise any beginner intermediate rider to try the clake. it teaches you not to clutch more then necessary (a pro rider skill). after using the clake for few weeks, you will find a lot easier to hold pressure and clutch it just until you hold the bike steady.... I try everything available on the market, sometimes feels weird but in the end always teaches you something    good luck 

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If you have ever ridden a bike down some of the mountain passes in France, that take 30 minutes to descend through all the hairpins, you would realise just how important it is to have independent brakes.

Going into a corner the front brake is used, as the rear wheel is so light.  However half way round the corner if you see the Armco getting closer, then the back brake is a must, as it tightens the turn radius... If you were to use the front brake, it would cause a slight front wheel slip, and a widening of the turn radius... Usually ends up with you over the Armco... Best of luck with that.

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43 minutes ago, phiggs said:

If you have ever ridden a bike down some of the mountain passes in France, that take 30 minutes to descend through all the hairpins, you would realise just how important it is to have independent brakes.

Going into a corner the front brake is used, as the rear wheel is so light.  However half way round the corner if you see the Armco getting closer, then the back brake is a must, as it tightens the turn radius... If you were to use the front brake, it would cause a slight front wheel slip, and a widening of the turn radius... Usually ends up with you over the Armco... Best of luck with that.

I always wondered why Honda fitted brakes that had a bit of front and back for this reason.  Also if you want to brake hard in the snow I would be very very wary of any front brake without the back wheel already locked up.  I put off buying a VFR800 for that reason until they (Honda) gave up on the idea in 2014.  (Still have not got the VFR as spending too much on trials bikes).

As I understood it at the time the thinking was the "born again biker" mob who instinctively use the foot pedal as they are really car drivers not motorcyclists.  As someone that had a bike before I could spell 'automobile' this is not really something that affects me.

I find it difficult to modulate the rear brake with trials boots and the bike at an angle that I am not accustomed to as a long time road rider.  I tend to over brake and lose the wheelie.  On my mountain bike I for some weird reason tend to forget the brake lever completely and fall off the back.  (No fun at all).  The TRS has a superb brake but the wife's Beta has a poor rear brake by comparison and it is actually a bit easier as it doesn't work so well and needs more pressure and does not brake as hard.

I am sure that better balance makes it less critical.  So just another two million hours practice....

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It's an interesting idea, and since I come from a bicycle trials/mountain bike back ground, I'd love to have dual hand brakes since that's what I'm most used to. 

 

Pretty sure those street freestyle peeps have a variation of this.  It's a 2nd lever placed under the clutch lever, or something along those lines.  They still need access to the rear brake when they're sitting on their tank doing wheelies.

 

I've also seen (more like heard of) people who run a Recluse clutch replace the clutch lever with a rear brake lever.  So for trail riding I think it's totally doable.  I RARELY use my clutch on trails (except to shift) and I don't even have a Recluse.  I've actually never replaced my rear brake pads (and only done my clutch once) as a result, lol...

 

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