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New 200 !!

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Has anyone tried , or even better own a new 200???

I am thinking of a new bike , and I must admit a 200 seems like a good idea ....

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Hi.... I have a 2020 and a 2018 Beta Evo 200. I have not ridden the new one much yet but the 2018 is a brilliant bike. 

They have enough power to tackle most clubman level sections but won't launch you into the surrounding countryside if you get it wrong. 

The only problem you might have is finding one as Beta only bring a handful into the UK each year (am assuming you are in the UK). I just looked on eBay and there are some listed so you might be lucky... 

 

 

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22 minutes ago, scatman said:

Hi.... I have a 2020 and a 2018 Beta Evo 200. I have not ridden the new one much yet but the 2018 is a brilliant bike. 

They have enough power to tackle most clubman level sections but won't launch you into the surrounding countryside if you get it wrong. 

The only problem you might have is finding one as Beta only bring a handful into the UK each year (am assuming you are in the UK). I just looked on eBay and there are some listed so you might be lucky... 

 

 

I was wondering about the Vertigo 200 ! I have owned several 200 Betas , and really sing their virtue .

But fancy something a bit different ....

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I rode a 250 Vertigo a few weeks ago, nice bike. I heard they were producing a 200 for 2020 but have not seen one, my guess is they will be built as they are ordered.

Would be interesting to read your impressions if you do get a go on one, or indeed buy one.... 

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The Beta 200 is actually a very different animal from the many of the older rider's weapon of choice, the detuned 300. Those type of bike mods are often discussed in these forums, employing lowered compression, flywheel weights and slow throttles. However the 200 is lively and benefits from a much more positive input than you need from the big engines. You can't just pull a big gear at relatively low revs and stand there, you have to make it go, spin it up and work it a bit! Of course it has the Beta advantages of good dynamic balance, grip and steering but, at least in my case also a fairly crappy back brake even with Galfer pads by comparison with my recent Spanish bikes (300 Gasser and Scorpa). Mine is the 2020 model by the way. 

You probably need to ride one in at least an event or a long practice session not just round the car park to know if you can get on with one and that will be hard to arrange I suspect. I have no idea what it's like up the rocky stream beds you northerners (UK obvs) love so that's question for someone else to answer. It's economical by the way, if that matters and as many have said not so tiring to ride. It goes up my local big chalk climbs nicely but remember the gears are 'shorter' than on a big engined bike so I think you need more care to keep the motor spinning in a sweet spot than on a 300. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, micm said:

The Beta 200 is actually a very different animal from the many of the older rider's weapon of choice, the detuned 300. Those type of bike mods are often discussed in these forums, employing lowered compression, flywheel weights and slow throttles. However the 200 is lively and benefits from a much more positive input than you need from the big engines. You can't just pull a big gear at relatively low revs and stand there, you have to make it go, spin it up and work it a bit! Of course it has the Beta advantages of good dynamic balance, grip and steering but, at least in my case also a fairly crappy back brake even with Galfer pads by comparison with my recent Spanish bikes (300 Gasser and Scorpa). Mine is the 2020 model by the way. 

You probably need to ride one in at least an event or a long practice session not just round the car park to know if you can get on with one and that will be hard to arrange I suspect. I have no idea what it's like up the rocky stream beds you northerners (UK obvs) love so that's question for someone else to answer. It's economical by the way, if that matters and as many have said not so tiring to ride. It goes up my local big chalk climbs nicely but remember the gears are 'shorter' than on a big engined bike so I think you need more care to keep the motor spinning in a sweet spot than on a 300. 

 

 

Hes talking about a vertigo, not a beta

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someone must have one as didn't BVM have a 200cc at there test day 

at the back end of last year. maybe vertigo uk still have it as a demo bike

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The pro: Yes, I rode one. Today. It was magical.

The con: While I'm not totally wet behind the ears, you might trust feedback from those with many years of trials riding under their belt. That's definitely not me. Still, here's my lowly feedback. ?

My background - riding for 40+years, but technical dirt riding is new-ish to me. Started trail riding 7-8 years ago, got on with more technical things on a Beta Xtrainer about 9 months back. Trials riding, even newer. I've been aboard a 4rt for several months, riding 3-4x a week and progressing nicely.

My wife and I are on a trip right now, and as luck would have it - we were passing nearby LewisportUSA, the US Vertigo importer. I've a friend who took a private lesson from Adrian Lewis and recommended him, so my intent was to get feedback from a professional, have my basics evaluated and put any feedback to work on my 4rt when I return home.

I don't have my bike with me, so rented one from Lewisport. Adrian started me on the Vertigo 250, and for the most part - I liked it far better than my 4rt almost immediately. I was more at ease, felt more balanced and the weight difference was very obvious to me. I actually found the 250 smoother than the 4rt down low, but at my skill level - the 2t snap was something to contend with when opening up the throttle more. And again, given my skill level - that happens with a bit of frequency inadvertently. Nothing scary, but it was definitely in the back of my mind at all times.

During our lunch break, I shared with Adrian wisdom read here about the Beta Evo 200. Basically, that so many of y'all have given it such rave reviews, and how it's plenty of bike for most riders. To which Adrian replied..."I've got a Vertigo 200 in the van. Want to try it out?"

It was his wife's bike, a 2020 one ride fresh, and I jumped at the chance. Let me say this...there was NOTHING subtle about the difference in this bike compared to the 250, and certainly not compared to my 4rt. Everything was easy. I hopped aboard, and was immediately holding static balance for 30 seconds - something I've struggled to maintain for more than 5 seconds prior. You could ride it down low however you wanted...plenty of clutch slipping (which is feather light and super smooth), or just roll the throttle on easy with no clutch. Wonderfully smooth and predictable in every situation, and just dang easy to ride. I spent the second half of the training on that bike, and it's not an exaggeration to say I was doing things I never expected to be doing. It was that good. And, while it did everything more smoothly than anything I'd ridden - it definitely was no slouch when you wanted to open up the throttle. However, that addicting yet totally controllable snap comes on at 3/4 throttle and higher RPM's, so being surprised with an inadvertent roll on never happened. It hit hard when I wanted it to, and only when I wanted it to.

So, how much did I like it? I bought one. The decision, while unexpected was easy...I've never been this excited about a new bike, and there have been a few for me.

Edited by syspig
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Dixie, did you get a Vertigo 200?

Anyone got one? Can you spill the beans on it?

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syspig, has returned to the Pacific Northwest, USA, with his Vertigo 200, after spending several weeks in the warmer Southwest. Several of the local trialers have gotten to throw a leg over it, both 4RT owners. Their opinions have been positive, but had not made any decisions to sell their 4RTs. syspig as reviewed in his post continues to sing it's praises. I hope to get a try on it in the next couple weeks.

Art  

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2 hours ago, sherco70 said:

Their opinions have been positive, but had not made any decisions to sell their 4RTs. syspig as reviewed in his post continues to sing it's praises. I hope to get a try on it in the next couple weeks.

Say when, Art!

I've now got about 10 hours on the 200, including my first trials event. Ran Sportsman, doing roughly 50% Novice and 50% Intermediate lines. Heavy rain and lots of soupy mud, 38 for the day, and I've zero doubt I'd have scored 15+ higher on the 4RT.

Every time I go out on it I get better, and the advancements are not subtle. It's so incredibly confidence inspiring for me compared to my 4RT, and that's led to much less hesitation when trying new things. Basically, when in doubt - point it, get the front end light and it does what I want it to. I just don't fight it as much. Anything that involves lofting the front wheel is especially easier for me. I never had any trouble getting the front wheel up on the 4RT - but for whatever reason, it was far more difficult for me to control when doing so. 

What's interesting though, is as Art mentioned - people certainly have their preferences. While there's some pretty universal praise for certain aspects of the bike, not all who have been on it were as taken with it as I have been. Both of my buds who have have ridden their 4RT's for a couple years spoke highly of the power delivery and clutch. Both of them immediately noticed how much lighter and responsive it is compared to their Montesas, but one of them didn't really consider that a positive. He actually preferred the added weight on his 4RT, saying he felt more "planted" when riding it. He also preferred the geometry and ergos of his 4RT, but admitted that could simply be familiarity. Another of my riding pals has relatively little time on trials bikes, but plenty of riding experience. He, like me, can't find anything he likes better on the Montesa.

So, perhaps unexpectedly - it's a chocolate and vanilla kind of thing. I'd certainly encourage anyone who has the chance to swing a leg over one.

Edited by syspig
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