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suzuki250

New trailer tyres, tubed or tubless?

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My trailer needs some new tyres, but I don’t know if I need tubed or tubeless. currently I have one of each!

Is there any difference in the rims?

I would normally just buy some new rims and tyres but they are odd ones with the bearings in the wheel!

Edited by suzuki250

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If they are the old wheels with integral bearings the tube is probably there to keep the old tyre inflated.  They are tubeless, everything is.  Old rims get rusty and don't seal and the bearing type rims are a pain to do at the roadside.  We are unable to source the rims any more and advise new suspension units with the more common bolt on wheels.  I would thoroughly check the suspension before you invest in the tyres.  If it is OK and you change the tyres yourself it is the lowest cost option.  I'd check the bearings at the same time and replace them too if they are not 100%.

Once you have the old tyre off you can inspect the rim and make your decision on the tube.  I'd be tempted to put in a tube if the rims are crappy.  New tyres will - of course - "repair" the puncture that probably was the reason for the tube.  Do you have a compressor?  You can inflate a tubed tyre easily with a foot pump but often need a compressor to seat the beads on a new tyre.  The new liquid latex sealants are very good and seal a puncture rather than go flat - even a tube will puncture.  I run latex in the mountain bike and it is very good.  Tubes increase the heat slightly in high speed applications like a trailer, but beyond that are a non issue.

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53 minutes ago, ChrisCH said:

If they are the old wheels with integral bearings the tube is probably there to keep the old tyre inflated.  They are tubeless, everything is.  Old rims get rusty and don't seal and the bearing type rims are a pain to do at the roadside.  We are unable to source the rims any more and advise new suspension units with the more common bolt on wheels.  I would thoroughly check the suspension before you invest in the tyres.  If it is OK and you change the tyres yourself it is the lowest cost option.  I'd check the bearings at the same time and replace them too if they are not 100%.

Once you have the old tyre off you can inspect the rim and make your decision on the tube.  I'd be tempted to put in a tube if the rims are crappy.  New tyres will - of course - "repair" the puncture that probably was the reason for the tube.  Do you have a compressor?  You can inflate a tubed tyre easily with a foot pump but often need a compressor to seat the beads on a new tyre.  The new liquid latex sealants are very good and seal a puncture rather than go flat - even a tube will puncture.  I run latex in the mountain bike and it is very good.  Tubes increase the heat slightly in high speed applications like a trailer, but beyond that are a non issue.

The rims are in reasonable condition, inside and out. 

the drop arms and stubs axles are also ok, do I need to check anything else on the suspension units? 

I would change the suspension, but they have been welded directly to the chassis! 

I have one brand new 4x4PCD 25mm hub assembly which someone gave me, but I cannot find anyone else who sells them. A few companies  have tried to sell me the 1" hubs!?!?!   

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If it is half decent order it is a shame to waste the stuff you have.  Just make sure the rubbers on the suspension are not perished.  If it is not left out in the sunshine it is probably OK.

The 25mm hubs are obsolete (at least as best we can find) - they have two roller bearings while the 1 inch has taper bearings.  Bearings should be easy to source.  Wheel nuts and studs should be OK as well so you should be able to keep the whole thing running for a while.

People do totally mess up trailers for some reason.  Welded on suspension is not that uncommon.  Bonkers.

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If you ever experienced a tubed trailer tyre tube failure at speed with a load, you'll understand why tubeless is the only way to go

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