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Difference between Rev 3 200 and 250


Hughie
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Hi Guys and Gals,

Can anyone tell me what the real world riding difference is between a 200 and a 250 Rev 3? I’m new to the sport and searched for a 200 but none were about so I ended up with a 250. I have read that the 200’s, either Rev 3 or Evo are the ‘holy grail’ for the beginner Clubman rider with the ideal spread of power etc.

Is there a big difference between the two? And if so are there sensible alterations I can do to the 250 to make it more like a 200 to ride? I ask this because at my standard I don’t need the power it has and in some ways it would be helpful to have less so I can master technique without worrying about the bike getting away from me so much. I have already fitted a slow throttle.

I’d be grateful for any insight on this.

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2 hours ago, Hughie said:

Hi Guys and Gals,

Can anyone tell me what the real world riding difference is between a 200 and a 250 Rev 3? I’m new to the sport and searched for a 200 but none were about so I ended up with a 250. I have read that the 200’s, either Rev 3 or Evo are the ‘holy grail’ for the beginner Clubman rider with the ideal spread of power etc.

Is there a big difference between the two? And if so are there sensible alterations I can do to the 250 to make it more like a 200 to ride? I ask this because at my standard I don’t need the power it has and in some ways it would be helpful to have less so I can master technique without worrying about the bike getting away from me so much. I have already fitted a slow throttle.

I’d be grateful for any insight on this.

The benefit of the Rev 3 200 that we bought for my wife (who was a trials learner in the 2000s) is that the throttle response is gentler than the bigger Betas and it is easier to kick over to start than the bigger Betas. There's not much in it though. A 250 is fine for a beginner with a slow action throttle and if necessary the additional options are reduced compression, additional flywheel mass and retarding the ignition.

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Thanks…. I already have the slow throttle and flywheel weight. I’d be interested to know the best way to reduce the compression maybe. It’s only really until I get more used to it, I feel I would rather learn and then go after more power when I need it rather than trying to learn techniques with more power than I need if that makes sense…

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The 200 is the perfect beginners bike, but not so many around, so the 250 is the next best option. Agree completely with slow throttle & flywheel weight, but I'd leave the ignition & compression alone.  Going down a tooth on the front sprocket is another way of slowing down proceedings, it's a quick, easy mod & you can easily revert back if you feel the need,  

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34 minutes ago, pjw123 said:

The 200 is the perfect beginners bike, but not so many around, so the 250 is the next best option. Agree completely with slow throttle & flywheel weight, but I'd leave the ignition & compression alone.  Going down a tooth on the front sprocket is another way of slowing down proceedings, it's a quick, easy mod & you can easily revert back if you feel the need,  

That’s a good idea, hadn’t thought of that…. I’ll give it a try, thanks 👍

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The Beta Rev 3 200 has a rear sprocket one tooth bigger than the 250 making it slightly lower geared. Check what you have fitted before buying one but from memory the 250 has a 40T the 200 a 41T. Changing the rear wheel sprocket does make a worthwhile difference along with a slow throttle and retaining the flywheel weight on the 250. The 200 I'm familiar with did not have the extra weight when new. With the carb nicely set up you should be okay. A reduction of one tooth on the gearbox sprocket equates to adding around four to the rear which would be much lower.

Edited by trialsrfun
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One extra tooth on the rear sprocket will not make any noticeable difference whatsoever.  Four teeth or even six extra teeth on the rear will make a noticeable difference, by slowing the bike down.  One less tooth on the front will also make a noticeable difference in slowing the bike down.  However, besides slowing the bike down, it will also increase the power at the back wheel!

Edited by stpauls
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1 hour ago, stpauls said:

One extra tooth on the rear sprocket will not make any noticeable difference whatsoever.  Four teeth or even six extra teeth on the rear will make a noticeable difference, by slowing the bike down.  One less tooth on the front will also make a noticeable difference in slowing the bike down.  However, besides slowing the bike down, it will also increase the power at the back wheel!

So are you saying there’s nothing that will achieve what I’m hoping to do? What would you suggest?

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Sometimes increasing the power to the back wheel is counter productive, especially in muddy conditions.   Learn to use the clutch by slow riding ( or static.), practice starts in a straight line, and also whilst cornering in tight spaces.   Remember, lowering the gearing effectively gives you one more lower gear ratio, but some sections require 2nd, or 3rd or more.

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On a Sherco you can/could retard the timing by 3mm (not 3 degrees).  This will make it softer when it revs up.  (Not sure if you can do this on a Beta).  

You could also fit an S3 low compression head.

Or/and fit an extra base gasket to lower the compression.  Preferably do all of the above.

I would get a 200cc Beta Rev 3 if I could find one. Very soft, but rare. The more modern Beta Evo 200cc bikes can still be a bit fiery - the newer ones even more so.

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51 minutes ago, stpauls said:

On a Sherco you can/could retard the timing by 3mm (not 3 degrees).  This will make it softer when it revs up.  (Not sure if you can do this on a Beta).  

You could also fit an S3 low compression head.

Or/and fit an extra base gasket to lower the compression.  Preferably do all of the above.

I would get a 200cc Beta Rev 3 if I could find one. Very soft, but rare. The more modern Beta Evo 200cc bikes can still be a bit fiery - the newer ones even more so.

 

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I’d heard that about the newer Evo 200’s, someone wrote a post saying the brand new ones are ruined (in his opinion) as they have completely lost their mellow nature. I’ve ordered a 10 tooth front sprocket, for the sake of £15 I though it was worth a go. I’ve learned not to use first gear anyway as it just seems too low, I realise this will make it even lower but I’ll see how second is with it, which is what I normally use mainly, or possibly third if it makes second too lively. I will also look into retarding the timing, again an easy reversal if I don’t like it before changing heads and base gaskets. I will look into the S3 head though as I wasn’t aware of it before.

If going down one tooth on the front doesn’t make sufficient difference I guess I could also try going up one on the rear (with the original 11 tooth front) to 42 which would then be the same sizes as a 200 has as standard, albeit I expect being a 250 it still wouldn’t be quite the same.

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S3 make a low compression head that tames the hit while keeping the grunt of displacement. Carbon reeds (I have Moto Tassinari VForce3 V351B with medium reeds) add to the bottom end and smooth the transition through the rev range. I can pull a gear higher with the carbon reeds. 

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On 1/13/2022 at 10:08 AM, Hughie said:

I’d heard that about the newer Evo 200’s, someone wrote a post saying the brand new ones are ruined (in his opinion) as they have completely lost their mellow nature. I’ve ordered a 10 tooth front sprocket, for the sake of £15 I though it was worth a go. I’ve learned not to use first gear anyway as it just seems too low, I realise this will make it even lower but I’ll see how second is with it, which is what I normally use mainly, or possibly third if it makes second too lively. I will also look into retarding the timing, again an easy reversal if I don’t like it before changing heads and base gaskets. I will look into the S3 head though as I wasn’t aware of it before.

If going down one tooth on the front doesn’t make sufficient difference I guess I could also try going up one on the rear (with the original 11 tooth front) to 42 which would then be the same sizes as a 200 has as standard, albeit I expect being a 250 it still wouldn’t be quite the same.

 My 2016 factory 250 I tried every combination of sprockets. It drove me nuts. I finally spent a few hours mathmatically crunching the numbers. I ended up with 9 and 44. This gave me a super usuable 2nd gear for almost all sections. This also makes 3rd gear the same as the stock second. First gear for only the tightest of sections. Good luck.

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On 1/14/2022 at 2:05 PM, dan williams said:

S3 make a low compression head that tames the hit while keeping the grunt of displacement. Carbon reeds (I have Moto Tassinari VForce3 V351B with medium reeds) add to the bottom end and smooth the transition through the rev range. I can pull a gear higher with the carbon reeds. 

I’ve had a look around and can only find the S3 heads for the Evo - Is the top end the same on the Rev3?

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