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Bl**dy Ouch…!


Hughie
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Well, I got to take the new (to me) 2020 200 Evo out today to Milton Buzzard practice ground. What a bike! It’s just lovely, the front end is as light as a feather and the power is pretty smooth. It’s a revelation compared to my Rev3.

Already managed to bin it though! Promised myself to not try anything I’m not confident with, at least for the first couple of outings so I could avoid dropping it. But then, I went over a log, no more than probably 12” or so in diameter, misplaced my front wheel on landing and went down in a hole beside the track. Bike up in the air, bar end straight in the thigh on landing. Ouch! Big lump there now! And, when I picked the bike up, somehow the rear wheel had come completely out of true and was rubbing on the swing arm.

Still, sorted that out and apart from a bit of a temporary limp, a red face and some temporary frustration all is well and the bike isn’t damaged.

I seem to have a bit of a bad habit though. I approach an obstacle and sometimes seem to lose control halfway through the movement and then ‘land’ badly as if I haven’t thought through the whole move including the ‘landing’. I feel like I’m not following through patiently or precisely. When this happens, all too often I end up on the deck. Then I’ll watch someone steadily doing what I was just doing as if it’s nothing at all. I’m hoping with practice it will all come good as falling off hurts too much, I’m not a teenager!

Love the bike though! 😀

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Nothing new there... sounds familiar to everyone(well except a lucky few)  practice and confidence. It will come but takes longer than many people think. When you gain confidence you will be less tense, allowing bike to move under you and respond with little movements to correct things. Watch other people’s body positioning and ask someone to watch you and see if anything you need to change. 

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Hi hughie, don't know what you've done before, but modern bikes are very quick on the steering and you need good core and upper body strength to keep the bike from tucking,also maintain a straight ahead position with the bars until after the landing.When I started riding I didn't think I would be a good rider and wasn't a natural at it so I did a lot of gym work, so when I got stuck I could lift the bike when I was stuck in rocks or on waterfalls and get myself going,as stops weren't allowed in them days [1974] and after a few years of riding you get to improve and enjoy the sport even more.Still riding and enjoy passing on tips to my old friends children now and within months they've achieved what took me years. So when the lads at your local club go practicing, join in and listen to their advice. Its just a great sport to keep you young and bruised ;-]

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18 minutes ago, trialman said:

Hi hughie, don't know what you've done before, but modern bikes are very quick on the steering and you need good core and upper body strength to keep the bike from tucking,also maintain a straight ahead position with the bars until after the landing.When I started riding I didn't think I would be a good rider and wasn't a natural at it so I did a lot of gym work, so when I got stuck I could lift the bike when I was stuck in rocks or on waterfalls and get myself going,as stops weren't allowed in them days [1974] and after a few years of riding you get to improve and enjoy the sport even more.Still riding and enjoy passing on tips to my old friends children now and within months they've achieved what took me years. So when the lads at your local club go practicing, join in and listen to their advice. Its just a great sport to keep you young and bruised ;-]

Thanks. I’ve been riding bikes since I was 13, 53 now but never tried riding competitively before. Always fancied trials but I’m also a musician so have spent my weekends travelling around doing that for the last 30 years but during Covid, when entertainment stopped, I had a bit of a ‘now or never’ moment and decided to try trials out.

Im loving it but am also not that great yet, only been going 6 months so there’s heaps to learn. The thing that’s surprised me most is that I always thought I had good balance and a good feel for a bike. I think, I’m my mind, I thought I would be a natural - how wrong I was! I lift weights 3 times a week and cycle a bit so I’m in reasonable shape, albeit not the skinniest. Quite fit though and lifting the bike is no problem.

I really do need to get the hang of thinking beyond ‘take off’ when I decide I’m going over obstacles though. Maybe I should stick to my camber turns, which also need lots of work, and leave the log hopping for later on!

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"following through" mentally can be important.  When I started, I always felt a bit out of control on the back side of logs.   My technique even included an odd triple blip for some unknown reason.  Finally, I realized that I was just thinking about getting over the log with no follow through of where to go next.  I altered my thought pattern to include placing the wheel on the ground on the far side of the log and results improved quickly. 

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15 minutes ago, mcman56 said:

"following through" mentally can be important.  When I started, I always felt a bit out of control on the back side of logs.   My technique even included an odd triple blip for some unknown reason.  Finally, I realized that I was just thinking about getting over the log with no follow through of where to go next.  I altered my thought pattern to include placing the wheel on the ground on the far side of the log and results improved quickly. 

That’s exactly what I need to do 👍

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Hi hughie, yep you have a lot to learn, it took me about 3years before I was fully competent. Trials is a very exacting sport and wheel placement is all important! In the superstars 6 competition back in the eighties don godden [grass track superstar] likened it to slow motion masochism he had that many offs, so just keep at it and practice practice practice it will all come together. Also riding road bikes does not give you a good sense off balance as you tend to lean into corners?? note which side you are putting your foot down will give you a clue?? trials technique is based on bike balance and a lot off the time too remain central on the bike and let the bike lean. Forget log jumping and set out the tightest you can do a figure eight, if you can maintain full lock on the turns you will find to do it well you will be above the bike and not leaning in!! Back in the day we had books by sammy miller,don smith and mick andrews who all worked on the basics of position for the bike and balance. So get on with it and find that time on the bike is time well spent,even if its only doing figure eights in the drive, and when you're that good put a brick in the turns so you have to contend with hopping over it on each turn!! all the best Trialman  

P.S I was out down the local wood at the weekend setting out some basic stuff for my mx mates who have found trials good fun, and all the others started joining in because they were simple but testing sections,requiring good balance and positioning even the better riders joined in because at the end off the day basics are what you should remember. Mick Andrews is fairly local and his teaching is second to none and he's just one off the lads who loves biking..;-] 

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Sound advice Trialman…. I’ve been practicing figure eights and static balance and am getting better each time but didn’t think of putting a brick down, that’s a great idea. I managed to track down a copy of Bernie Schreibers book online which makes for great reading, I didn’t realise there were Mick Andrews and Sammy Miller books as well, I’ll keep my eye out. I want to read anything and everything I can find.

Also, I hear what your saying about log hopping…. It’s just too tempting when they are in front of you. The Devil makes me do it (bit I really ought to stop until I’m better equipped!).

Thanks for the tips 👍

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