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Lacing new tubeless rear wheel


markbxr400
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I found a great deal on a new 2017 Montesa 300RR (already have the identical bike, so just swapping to a new one).  The great deal came with one flaw.  The tubeless rim hoop on the rear had a couple of spoke tabs that were broken, where it appears the wheel must have been struck.  Spokes were all good, hub was good, so just needed a new rim hoop.  I tried to be an entire wheel assembly, but US Honda, Partzilla and others all show the replacement wheel is one backorder, with no estimated date of availability.  I was able to find an OEM rim hoop, so ordered and received it.  Also bought a truing stand.

So tonight, I removed the wheel off the bike, removed the tire.

I took measurements and also got the factory specs for offset, spoke torque, etc. I zip-tied spoke pairs together, then used 4 colors of tape, numbering from 1 to 32 starting at the valve stem. Planning to reuse existing spokes as the bike is brand new.

As I started loosening spokes, it became obvious that I cannot simply loosen all the turn buckles until they come off, as all of the spokes grow and there is not enough room on the straight (hub) side for the spokes to simply slide through as they lengthen, because they hit adjoining spokes.

What is the trick with this style spoke?

Only way I can think to do this is to loosen only the spokes that fan in one direction, while either leaving alone (or even tightening) the spokes fanning the other direction, until half the turnbuckles can be removed, then loosen the opposite half of the spokes.

Before I continue further, thought I'd check to see if someone here has actually done one of these wheels and knows the trick.

Many thanks for any help.

 

 

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I was able to get it apart. I could not loosen all of the spokes at once. It puts the whole system in a huge bind. Think about all the spokes growing in length with both ends fixed. Not like a regular wheel where you're putting the nipple through the rim. There was not enough room on the hub side for the long spoke to slide through the hub hole enough to break the turnbuckle free from the spokes. That spoke end is kind of a tight fit where it pulls into the hole in the hub. With a little persuasion, it finally pushes through the hole in the hub, but you have to help it push through.  But then, it hits up against a nearby spoke.  So it doesn't slide through enough to break the spoke apart at the turnbuckle.

So, I cut each ziptie and replaced it with a loose one to keep the pair together, while not restricting the spoke from moving. I loosened all of the spokes with the same fan direction, both sides of the hub, while tightening the spokes that fanned the opposite direction on both sides of the hub. This allowed the rim to twist enough relative to the hub to get the turnbuckles off. They didn't come off freely, they still required some persuasion, bowing the spokes slightly, or pushing down (or up) on the rim in the area where I was trying to remove a spoke.

Tomorrow evening, I'll make an attempt at putting it back together. I don't know of another approach than try to connect all the spokes that fan one direction, once all are attached, tighten them beyond where they ultimately will end up, and then try to force the spokes that fan the opposite direction together.

Sure seems like there must be a way to do this without forcing anything. I've spoken to several wheel builders, but none have put one of these type wheels together. I guess the good news is these wheels hold up well.

Any expert advice is appreciated as to the process and tricks to put this type of wheel together.

 

 

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Edited by markbxr400
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I recently replaced 7 bent spokes on that style of rim, disassembled, reassembled, etc.

Much cursing and swearing, sorry don't have a trick other than patience.  but there is a point in the "length" of the spoke where the hub side is past the bend in the spoke but not touching the end stop of the spoke.  This allows a little room to slide back and forth a little bit. I did have to do a little forcing to get spokes started in the turnbuckle.

I tried to start both spokes in the turnbuckle at the same time, so that one end would not bottom out before the other and have maximum adjustment available.

 

 

Oh and good luck

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14 hours ago, zippy said:

I recently replaced 7 bent spokes on that style of rim, disassembled, reassembled, etc.

Much cursing and swearing, sorry don't have a trick other than patience.  but there is a point in the "length" of the spoke where the hub side is past the bend in the spoke but not touching the end stop of the spoke.  This allows a little room to slide back and forth a little bit. I did have to do a little forcing to get spokes started in the turnbuckle.

I tried to start both spokes in the turnbuckle at the same time, so that one end would not bottom out before the other and have maximum adjustment available.

 

 

Oh and good luck

Thanks.  Been out cutting dead limbs all day on my property out of my manlift, so have no patience or energy to try to tackle it tonight.  At best, I might put some antisieze on all the threads.

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3 hours ago, markbxr400 said:

Thanks.  Been out cutting dead limbs all day on my property out of my manlift, so have no patience or energy to try to tackle it tonight.  At best, I might put some antisieze on all the threads.

If you come up with a better process for lacing these types of rims, Please share the info.

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4 hours ago, sectionone said:

I would have just had the broken tabs welded.

Thanks.  That ship has already sailed as the old hoop has already been removed and I have the new hoop on hand.  Will remember that if there's ever a next time.

The good news is that I've found a wheel builder in the UK that's doing some vintage tubeless wheel builds for me and my son that has extensive knowledge of these type wheels.  Have messaged him and have an initial response with his willingness to virtually help me get it back together.

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5 hours ago, markbxr400 said:

 

The good news is that I've found a wheel builder in the UK that's doing some vintage tubeless wheel builds for me and my son that has extensive knowledge of these type wheels.  Have messaged him and have an initial response with his willingness to virtually help me get it back together.

Yep, that is a better process. :D

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