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brucey

2014 4RT poor rear brake

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Heat them up and cool them down, it might not be the way to treat metal........  But it gives a good brake. Try it. Just riding around the street in 1st gear will generate enough heat, then stick the hose pipe on it.

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19 hours ago, brucey said:

...

Are poor rear brakes common on 4RT's?

 

Bruce.

No I would not say poor rear brakes are common on a 4RT.  Both my 07 and my 2017 300RR have great brakes.  One of our other group riders has a standard 2017 4RT that is great brakes, my friends 05 has no issues as well.  Have seen a few 2014 and 2015's at some events with great performance.  

I suspect its just a little ware in time or maybe some other edge case issue.  Heat and the quench cycle worked great on one set of pads on my 07 that gave me a small bit of trouble when I first changed them but they set in quick.

Edited by jonnyc21

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12 hours ago, brucey said:

Thanks imexian, food for thought.

It seems like there is basically a lack of friction between the pad and disc (unlike yourself and Nebulous :-) ) 

Also the old pads I replaced look like Fren which would explain why they weren't so good even though they were hardly worn!  I just assumed they were contaminated.

Red galfers are the best pads 👍

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10 hours ago, Nebulous said:

“Gold Fren Ceramic Carbon”? Was late at night , and it just sounded expensive to me. Thanks for putting me straight.  All that glitters is not Gold I guess.   But whatever the pad’s pedigree - it didn’t really stand a chance of success anyway.  Guess my next question would then be - why install such cheap muck on a 4RT? And then why post on here when it doesn’t work with a scored-disc , that has been prepared with grit?

As for the water-treatment - I would be concerned about quickly cooling any metal parts. Such as the plates of those pads , and especially the caliper itself - when wrapped around a freshly retracted red-hot piston. Not to mention the disc itself.  Any “professionals” doing this in the field- I would point-out that whilst it may be a quick fix - don’t forget that they have a shed-load of new parts to slap-on the bike later.

I’ll respectfully change “Twaddle” to “Inadvisable” - and impractical for long-term integrity and performance.

It works and isn't dangerous in my experience. No different to crossing a stream at the foot of a long descent 

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Many thanks for all the replies.  I have a number of things I can try now.

 

Your help is much appreciated.

 

Bruce.

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3 hours ago, brucey said:

  I have a number of things I can try now.

Galfers on Ebay right now.  £18.99 including a complementary bottle of SSDT special-edition Highland Spring!

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O.K.  I ran my Montesa up and down the road for around 5 mins with the rear brake slightly on.  It felt like it was biting a bit better and the disc just started going a very light straw colour!

I then dowsed it with a watering can full of water until completely cooled.  This transformed the  brake and it now easily locks the back wheel on tarmac with only a light application of the back brake.

If fact it worked so well, I repeated the excercise on the front brake!  Again, it made a significant improvement.

Thanks guys. :-)

I hope this thread may come in useful to others with the same issue.

 

Bruce.

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