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guy53

Clutch

8 posts in this topic

I've been riding bikes for a loooong time and It was always a crime ( or a call to the hospital )  to use the clutch when going down a steep hill, followed the same rule with the 75 TY that I've been riding the last 10 years. I bought a Beta Rev this summer and use the same technic, but it seems that modern bike riders use the clutch in steep descent, am I right ?

 

Guy

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As far as I'm concerned ..., only if you can't modulate your back brake good enough to keep from stalling or skidding , But I have used it on STEEP down hill turns ! :)

 Like all trials it depends on the section ....

Edited by axulsuv

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 It all depends on brakes, clutch, gearing and amount of flywheel vs. traction, grade (Steepness) and skill level. 

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guy35,

 

This is my 2 cents take it for what its worth. 

 

Clutch useage down hill... on my wifes 08 Gas Gas 125 I don't often if ever use or pull in the clutch when doing a section going down hill(s), however with the extra engen braking of my 07 Montesa 4RT I have found I do on occasion use the clutch to keep better control by preventing the rear from sliding.  On the larger bore bikes with higher compression heads etc. I could see where this might be the same on a 250 to 300 2T, however I would guess a little less common. 

 

Something to think about maybe?

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Guy, young riders who ride twinshocks set a faster idle than you or I would usually have and they use the clutch almost everywhere so it is not really a "bike" thing, more of a "rider" thing when or if to use the clutch.

I confess to using the clutch sometimes on my old trials bikes

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The brake on both end of the Beta ( 250 ) are amazing compared to any TS I ever rode, after an hour or so in the mountain, I had figured out how to think about braking than gently pressured the pedal instead of pushing on the pedal and waiting for the result. So if I understand what you are saying, the best way is the way I am confident with ?

 

 

Guy

 

 

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If its of any use to you,this is the method that I use most of the time on a modern disc braked bike and it works in wet or dry conditions on steep hills.....pull clutch lever to bar held with all fingers so you have a good grip of the handle bar.....apply front brake by pulling lever with one or two fingers just so that the pads are dragging on the disc creating some light braking but that would never lock the front wheel if you were to ride over a low grip area......now you control the speed of descent only with rear disc and can have it locked up solid with the rear tyre skidding while you react to any fish tailing movement of the back end with your body.

 

The main thing being the slower the start of the descent the easier it is to control the speed,I  see a lot of people go shooting off over the edge of a descent then start the braking after they have gained some speed. I started using the total de- clutching techique after studying how top riders take on descents......and there are many occasions when they have their rear wheels locked up solid during steep descents.

Edited by oni nou
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I went to the riding area alone this weekend with my mind set on that issue. I chose a 100 foot long 45 to 50 degree hill with 1 to 6 inch loose rock and dirt to test. The result is no real winner : I guess I'm more confortable with the clutch out probably because I learned that way, I feel safer knowing I can blip the throttle if needed to get me out off trouble and I notice I have my clutch finger instinctively ready all the time. When I used the clutch, I just needed to be a little more careful not to lock the rear wheel.

 

Guy

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