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petecam

I'm Giving Her Too Many Fingers !

19 posts in this topic

The bike that is :-)

Due to my hands not being that big I find it much easier to hold the clutch and brake levers with 2 fingers.

However a friend who has been riding for years said I will get better control if I just use one finger.

Do I need to try and train myself or doesn't it matter?

Thanks

Pete

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That would mean that you're holding onto the left hand-side of the bars with only your two weakest fingers? Impressive!

Unless you are on a twin-shock, with a seat, and no real power ^_^...and if you are on a twin-shock you would definitely need two fingers on that cable clutch.

Could you please update your profile to help?

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Agree with above. Even using one finger I still find myself wishing I had a few extras on each hand. Not as if im doing BIG obstacles but when you do move onto bigger stuff, you will be needing as many fingers on the bar as possible.

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Hi...profile updated I have a Beta Rev 3 2004.

OK, I should probably clarify a bit more, when I'm riding I have all my fingers on the bars, when I use the brake or clutch I then grab with 2 fingers.

My mate thinks I should always keep one finger on the lever all the times so I can react quicker.

cheers

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I think your mate is right. There's a couple of things to try, firstly move your lever as far from the grip (this also saves levers in the event of a crash) as you can and just use just your index finger. This gives a mechanical advantage and will make the clutch feel lighter.

Secondly, I like the clutch biting point really close to the bars, even to the point of slight clutch drag as I have much more control with my finger wrapped around the lever as opposed to using my finger fully extended. This also seems to help with clutch finger fatigue.

Hope this helps...?

That would mean that you're holding onto the left hand-side of the bars with only your two weakest fingers? Impressive!

Unless you are on a twin-shock, with a seat, and no real power ^_^...and if you are on a twin-shock you would definitely need two fingers on that cable clutch.

Could you please update your profile to help?

My mates Fantic twin shock cable clutch is as light as any huydaulic clutch Ive tried... ^_^

Edited by joeninety
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Thing is when you do bigger obstacles, or any for that matter.....you will or should always have the clutch and brake under full control.....therefore leaving 3 finger and thumb on the bars. In your case, 2 fingers and a thumb.

Learn to ride with one finger on each leaver, its the right way to do it.

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You can adjust the lever inwards and the bite point. Also heat and bend the lever in slightly for a closer reach.

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I have a friend that has ridden for years using the middle finger. Maybe that will help, being the longest finger. He says it gives him better grip!

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Harley riders use their middle finger a lot too..... Wait not so much for clutching though...

I agree it helps a lot to move the perch over so you have more leverage on the master and the end of the lever has more range of motion as well, easier to modulate engagement

Tape your middle finger to the next one so you can't use it, it will help to break the habit

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Now thats a good idea.....im gonna try tape my hands to the bars except for my index fingers and also tape my boots to the pegs......that will certainly solve a few of my issues :D

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Thanks all....I tweaked my levers last night so will test when I'm out next weekend. I also had a spin on my mates 4RT today and ensured I only used one finger from the off, it felt OK to be honest.

That said I think the 4RT clutch is a bit nicer than my Beta's !

cheers

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For a laugh we rode sections without even covering the clutch or using it. Then used 1st gear as it was a 2/3 gear climb. Ironically we did better in 1st not using clutch as feathering clutch lost traction we concluded.

This is the ACU 2015 non stop regs :banana2:

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Morning

I've been out on my push bike a few times and been holding the brakes with one finger to get used to it.

Spent the day practicing yesterday on the Beta and worked hard on only using one finger for the brake and clutch, for the most part it worked, it was only right at the end of the day when I was tired I found myself pulling the clutch with my hand.

Thanks for the tips all.

Pete

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I was doing a search for FAQ's of trial bike clutches, mainly - Do you really ride the clutch all the time, or have I just gotten the wrong impression? If so, do they end up requiring frequent replacement? I understand the differences of a car clutch being dry and all, but I wouldn't expect to use my Ninja like that and have much of a clutch left at the end of the season. Are modern trials bike clutches uniquely more robust than other motorcycles?

 

I have only logged in a few minutes on my sons TY175 and the clutch feels very light to me. It is hard to wrap my head around how good that little thing works for a 40 year old bike!

 

I am looking forward to getting a newer style for myself. Man I wish there were a few near me that could test out, it would do so much to help me understand what I may want to look for as the TY is the only trials I have ever tried. I wanted an older one for my son because he has very little motorcycle time logged and should have a seat until he gets board enough to be a little more adventurous with his riding and he is very proud of his old TY. I have had more than 30 bikes since my 1st in 1974 street, motocross and enduro but never rode a trials until last summer.

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Using the clutch is more involved in trials riding that regular riding. I wouldn't really call it riding the clutch but you are using it for more than just changing gears and stopping. Another thing to consider is that although trials is WAY slower riding compared to street riding things tend to happen REALLY fast when you least expect it to so having a finger on the clutch lever at all times helps with the required split second response. As mentioned above you can adjust the contact point so the clutch doesn't engage until you have it pulled in almost all the way so you are riding with the lever pulled in but without the clutch engaged then when **** happens(and it will) you only need to pull the lever a couple of centimetres to engage it. I should note that even with your finger hovering at the ready you can be too slow to react as seen in this picture of Barry on his new 280 a few years ago...

DSC_5928-XL.jpg

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