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trapezeartist

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About trapezeartist

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    Advanced Member

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  • Bike
    Beta Evo 250

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  • Location
    Zummerzet
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. Thanks for your comments thall1 and huski. Both valid points, I think. However I was thinking about it in bed this morning and I believe I made a silly error. The air gaps are supposed to be set with the fork on full bump. I forgot that and then because I couldn't get the spring out I filled the left hand leg on full droop.🤒 So next time out in the garage I'll be trying harder to get the spring out and then hopefully refill to the correct level. I have some urgent grandfatherly duties over the next few days though, so it may be later in the week before I can do it.
  2. Overbore sizes are generally marked as +0.020" or similar. Letters (typically A to D) are grades. Mass production isn't precise enough to make bores and pistons as accurate as they need to be. So they are measured after machining and marked accordingly. D pistons go in D bores, and so on.
  3. You could have raised the same points about the Second World War. That went on far longer and cost far more in money and lives (we hope). In the end, every form of motorsport was better after the war than before. I hope I'm right.
  4. I have the same problem. I'll try this suggestion.
  5. And it was all going so well.... I dropped out the stanchions and drained the oil out of them. Both were low on oil: the right hand was 125mm below the top when it should be 65mm. The left hand should be 125mm but it was way less and I couldn't measure it. So I refilled with Putoline HPX 5W and carefully set the oil height to the spec. There were a couple of issues but I decided to park them for another day. I couldn't get the plastic tube out of the left leg (as mentioned in the other post on here https://www.trialscentral.com/forums/topic/70417-beta-evo-left-fork-spring-stuckurgent/) but I thought I could just leave it. The preload adjuster is thoroughly seized in the cap so I will have to get a new cap and adjuster when the house arrest is over. Meanwhile there appeared to be only a tiny amount of preload, so no worries. Once it was all back together I started checking sag. I was working on my own so my measurements weren't millimetre accurate but they were good enough. I was only getting 31mm of sag which equates to 19%. Bouncing down on the front showed that it was very stiff. For comparison the rear sag measured over 100mm. The manual doesn't give a figure for rear suspension travel but I'm pretty sure it's not 300mm so it appears pretty soggy, though it seems OK subjectively. So why has the front become so stiff? Possibly there's a much stiffer spring in there, and the previous owner compensated by lowering the oil level to reduce the effect of the "air spring". I tried cracking open the caps so that the air leaked out on bump. It didn't make much difference. I'm puzzled, so now trying to borrow a slide hammer so that I can get the spring out and hopefully identify if it's a standard or fat-boy spec. I could lower the oil levels and see what that does, but it seems all wrong to try to make two wrongs = one right. Final comment: pushing down on the middle of the bike shows an extreme difference between the deflection of front and rear.
  6. I don't think I've touched the suspension setup on my 2014 250 Evo since I got it last year. But now being under house arrest, I've cleaned and polished everything, I stood beside the bike with rag in hand defying any speck of dust to land on it, and then I thought I would see if I can do anything to improve the suspension generally. I've just been looking at the Owner's Manual and that is about as much use as a chocolate teapot. My intention is to set up the sag by adjusting preload at both ends. I've seen figures of 33% and 38%. Any other opinions? I think it's best to get the oil out of the forks and replace it as I have no idea what is in there or how much. What weight of oil do people recommend? How do you measure the correct amount? Do I have to drop the stanchions out of the triple clamp and work on them separately? Finally I will have to adjust the damper screws. What settings do people suggest? I weigh about 80kg. Thanks.
  7. Did I even say I am going anywhere to practice? Don't be a dick - stop jumping to conclusions.
  8. The ACU considers trials sufficiently safe that they don’t mandate any medical cover for trials. But then tell us not to practice because we will be putting pressure on the NHS. Meanwhile walkers are stepping off pavements into the road willy-billy to maintain their 2m separation.
  9. trapezeartist

    Boots

    I find it staggering that people would sell or buy trials boots that are not waterproof. It’s like having a raincoat that’s not waterproof. Or a colander with no holes in it.
  10. I didn't realise Diane Abbott is working as a US journalist now. 🤣
  11. I tried a number of oils in my 2014 Evo. I've now settled on Nanotrans as it gives me the best clutch.
  12. I loved the video too. And I thought stop-allowed combined with the time limit worked well. No-stop would be a nightmare at that level. It was a real problem at the Southern Experts last year when we were told to be super strict on stopping.
  13. I carry one bike in a Berlingo car. Seats removed and an infill in the rear lh footwell. I put the front wheel against the BC post on the passenger side and the back wheel then needs to be fairly close to the driver's side to shut the tailgate. So one bike is easy and doesn't require any precision or fiddling about. I can see how benbeta's solution for two bikes would work, but I really wouldn't fancy driving with the front wheel of a bike between the seats and blocking the handbrake. If it really has to be a Berlingo (I understand that. Nothing bigger would fit in front of my garage.) then one bike inside and the other on a bike rack seems like the best solution.
  14. I suppose it depends how often you wear them. My 2-3 year-old Gaerne's are standing up well. I was amazed when I came in to trials that they were the only boots that claimed to be waterproof. It seems like such a fundamental requirement. Anyway, I'm very happy with mine, my feet stay dry and warm and I only wear an ordinary pair of poly-cotton socks with them. (I would wear some thermal socks, but I should have bought the boots a size bigger.)
  15. Let’s agree to disagree. The world would be a boring place if everyone thought the same about everything. (But you’re still wrong.?)
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