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markparrish

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About markparrish

  • Rank
    Mark Parrish

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  • Bike
    Beta Evo 250 4T

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  • Website URL
    http://buttondesign.co.uk/

Profile Information

  • Location
    West Sussex
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. I guessed the hex head would be for holding whilst you tighten the spindle (it doesn't have much to get a purchase on). If it was threaded it would make some sense to be left handed but a bit of a mystery! hopefully someone on here will have some knowledge of the frame. Good luck with it.
  2. it might be worth screwing the spindle back in all the way, and then back off about one turn. Try a gentle tap inwards with a soft faced hammer or normal hammer with alloy spacer. This might drift out the threaded section at the other end. If it doesn't budge it probably means it is also threaded in but my feeling is it wouldn't be. If it does move, remove spindle and use a soft drift so you don't damage any threads. Good luck
  3. I've been making a full sized drawing in preparation for making a frame for my C15 - I am basing it on the "Otter" but experimenting with the bits I have and the bits I think I could make. It will be a "special" but, as it is, it wouldn't meet Scottish regulations so I'm not spoiling anything. I love making things I can use, so that's good enough for me! Good luck with yours. I'd love to see your frame jig.
  4. If you can afford a new bike, why not buy the right one rather than "taming" the wrong one? Go for a 250!
  5. I'm just trying to get my head around all this - for a project I am planning. This thread on another site (I hope I'm allowed to post this - please let me know if not and I'll remove it) https://trials.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=9348 explains the complex relationship between all the geometry you are playing with. It has helped me to realise that just changing one thing to match another bike won't necessarily make your bike better. Good luck - let us know what you decide and how it works.
  6. maybe one of these? ...sorry, not very funny!
  7. Anything at all would be great for me! I'm still riding beginners routes and our local trials are usually based on a series of steep climbs/turns on muddy/chalky ground, so I rarely encounter rocks. I can just about clear small logs (not pretty!), so any techniques for negotiating modest obstacles/logs/steps would be good for me to practice. I agree that some of the expert videos assume a lot of basic knowledge, but I guess that's appropriate for what they are. There isn't too much I am aware of for some "beginner" progression. Thanks
  8. That's a really helpful way to show what you are doing! I'd love to see a few more of these kinds of tips... they are very helpful for those like me who want to progress a bit. Thanks!
  9. looks like a great event! Nice to see so many ages of rider all enjoying the same area.
  10. markparrish

    Tire musings

    My rev 3 rim was quite corroded when I took off the old rear tyre, and despite my best efforts I couldn't get a good seal from the rim band, so I fitted a tube. With a nice new Michelin the grip was amazing and the tyre stayed seated properly. Good luck.
  11. I was in the same position as you when I bought a Rev 3 - I asked and searched for about two years and eventually gave up and ordered a "generic" stand which I thought I might be able to adapt...and surprise, surprise a 2nd hand Rev 3 one came up on auction the same week! So perhaps if you have no luck, order something else?! There seem to be lots of bikes with stands removed, so they must be about somewhere though - Good luck.
  12. If it's on level ground I would say no brake needed - maybe just cover the front brake. It's a lot of clutch control.
  13. My money is on a blocked jet or an air leak between carb and engine.
  14. my friend modified his by cutting a couple of slots in the floor near the front for the front wheels of two bikes to partially drop into, before strapping them down. He can still use it as a proper trailer between trials - clever, I thought!
  15. Just had a look at mine to gauge the amount of space. I wonder if you could pack out and protect the inside of the frame with some hardwood or aluminium and then use a steel wedge (a bit like the ones used to release a drill from a morse taper sleeve) to drive the bolt back through the way it came. You could work from below, tapping the wedge upwards and when (if!) the bolt moves a little, add a spacer and repeat - it may free up once the broken end clears the bush.
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