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Fatboydel888

Front wheel removal

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Having some issues getting the front wheel out of my txt 250 pro. I have undone all of the screws on the bottom clamps and was expecting to just tap the shaft through, but it is stuck solid, is it normally that tight? Don’t really want to hit it too hard if there is something else stopping it.

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Depending on what year your bike is:

You will need to remove the bolt that holds the shaft in place.

image.png.72680d1f20789f72fe60cdbc5d029706.png

Or you will need to unthread the shaft from the opposite fork tube

image.png.970ae2bd3599d2eaec6d9219a451b956.png

 

** both photos from Ebay listings bymdyztri and trialsbikebreakersuk respectively **

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Ok thanks, so I think I have the first one, as it has a large Allen key cap in the end. So do I do the clamp bolts back up and then unscrew this cap, then undo them and withdraw the shaft. Really odd set up if you ask me...

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44 minutes ago, Fatboydel888 said:

Ok thanks, so I think I have the first one, as it has a large Allen key cap in the end. So do I do the clamp bolts back up and then unscrew this cap, then undo them and withdraw the shaft. Really odd set up if you ask me...

it is not an odd set up at all ,its designed to be as easy as possible to remove and replace the front wheel........it could not be more simple........if the spindle is threaded and screws into the fork leg then there is a chance of damaged threads while rushing the job spoiling the party and it is slower to get back together ...not what you want hallway through the Scott or SSDT trial.

Yes obviously tighten the pinch bolts on the right fork leg [kick start side]to stop the spindle/axle from turning but have the left side pinch bolts loose then remove the end cap by turning it anti clockwise[ normal threads]that is there to stop the spindle from falling out if the pinch bolts were left loose or snapped .

Edited by oni nou

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1 minute ago, Fatboydel888 said:

Ok thanks, what I really need is a service manual, is there one available?

trialspartsusa account by  Jim Snell on you tube has video tutorials for certain GasGas stuff and the parts manuals are available at gasgas.es with exploded images to give an idea of what parts are involved ..but there are no Haynes type manuals available.

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I finally managed to get the Allen nut undone, had to use a length of tube on the key as it was mega tight. Don’t think it needed to be that tight tbh.

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14 hours ago, Fatboydel888 said:

I finally managed to get the Allen nut undone, had to use a length of tube on the key as it was mega tight. Don’t think it needed to be that tight tbh.

Probably didn't need to be quite that tight.

I have the old style with the axle threading directing into the fork tube, I usually tighten mine by hand to be pretty snug and then a couple moderate whacks with the rubber mallet on the Allen key and good to go.

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Head bearings replaced and all good now, hardest part was getting the front wheel out!

 

just need to sort the starting issue now, takes about 50 kicks. Will try some fresh fuel first as the previous owner said what’s in there is over a year old.

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Not sure if this is your first GasGas, starting technique is important

Fresh Fuel

support bike - on a stand, lean against tree etc.

be "on top" of the bike

take up slack in kickstarter

kick down and through with authority

 

(quick stabs at the kickstarter tends to break things)

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If I may, I'll add my take to Zippy's procedure as it helped me immensely ... before kicking ... engage 2nd gear ... clutch out ... roll backwards until it stops (and this positions the piston for maximum travel time when you kick) ... clutch in ... and now kick as Zippy described. My bike likes a slight twist of the throttle when kicking. I can spark my bike in two kicks when cold and one kick when hot. But it is a procedure and you do have to follow one. If you get excited/frustrated and just start kicking you'll wear yourself out and will likely damage the starting gear. Have fun.

Edited by d2w

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On 8/4/2018 at 5:09 AM, d2w said:

If I may, I'll add my take to Zippy's procedure as it helped me immensely ... before kicking ... engage 2nd gear ... clutch out ... roll backwards until it stops (and this positions the piston for maximum travel time when you kick) ... clutch in ... and now kick as Zippy described. My bike likes a slight twist of the throttle when kicking. I can spark my bike in two kicks when cold and one kick when hot. But it is a procedure and you do have to follow one. If you get excited/frustrated and just start kicking you'll wear yourself out and will likely damage the starting gear. Have fun.

My technique is the same, with the same results :)

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