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nhuskys

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  1. Both are the correct. I'm in the USA, but I think this is how it works in the UK? A UK rider can correct any errors I've made. Young riders compete first by wheel size, mostly on electric trials motorcycles. Usually you would start and the local club level, then your ACU Centre. If you are so inclined you can compete at the National level. A young rider would progress to an 80cc and then at a certain age ( I think 12) to a 125.They could compete locally, in a youth National Series, and in the 125 class in ACU Trial GB series. A very competent rider, might choose to compete in the FIM European Championship, and the the Trial GP FIM World Championship in the 125 class, from there at 17 or 18, they can progress to a larger capacity bike in Trial 2 and then Trial GP. In the USA youth riders start the same, but can step up to any capacity bike at 12 or 13 years old.
  2. Alex Snoop in NY is a good resource for you. http://yankee500z.com/links.php
  3. I would say impossible to get a MSO reissued for a 40 plus year old bike, that the manufacturer, importer, and most likely the dealer doesn't exist anymore? I did buy a used Husqvarna WR125, about16 years ago, that the dealer (who was the original seller) I was buying it from had the MSO reissued. It wasn't actually missing, but the dealer knew I wanted to street register it to ride enduros. The original MSO had an off road only restriction. New bikes that year had a non-restricted MSO. He applied for a new one and it came without the off road restriction. I'd say you need to contact a title company. They will create the paper trail you need to register it. I believe you can do it through companies in Maine?
  4. Congratulations! I'm glad you found one used. Enjoy!
  5. nhuskys

    What Beta

    I'd say a Standard Evo with the Ohlins upgrade would be good to go. I rode the 250 and 300 '22 Evos and they feel really good in comparison to my '21 Factory. There was just an article in a mag on the '22 Evo 250 and 300, where the test rider was deciding which displacement he would ride at the SSDT. He had his mind pretty set on the 300, but then reconsidered trying it on the 250 after riding it, and watching John Lampkin ride it.
  6. nhuskys

    Beta or Fantic!

    I'll give you my experience... I'm 67 years old and a lifelong enduro rider who was always around trials, but thought it was slow and boring. I lived in a trials rich area, with many National rounds, 5 World Rounds and a TDN all within 20 miles of my home. I attended many of these trials. In 2006 a member of my enduro club who is a trials rider, convinced me to buy a 1984 Fantic 300. I rode 2 local club trials and had a good time, but didn't really catch the bug. The Fantic was tall and heavy, with the flywheel of a locomotive, and poor brakes. I was busy riding enduros and XC events on my modern and vintage Husqvarnas, so the Fantic sat. 10 years later I thought I'd give it another go, so got the Fantic out, attended a trials school put on by the local vintage trials club. This made me realize that I liked trials, but had no attachment to old bikes that I never had competed on. At the same time I decided to order a new Gas Gas 125, as I'd had enough of minimal brakes and heavy weight of the Fantic. I found I progressed much more quickly and easily on a modern light bike, with good brakes and an easy to use clutch. I had an eager buyer for the Fantic, so let it go. A number of friends started riding the vintage series, so I picked up a TY175. I rode it a bit, but wasn't a good enough rider to go between a modern and twin shock bike readily. I sold it to a local rider who has been riding since the 1970's, and he won the National Championship in the twin shock class last year on it. A couple years later while recovering from a hip replacement I attended a local vintage trial, and it looked like everyone was having a lot of fun. A couple days later a riding friend getting out of trials, called to ask if I knew anyone interested in his Fantic 240? I bought it, but once again it felt too different from my modern bike, and I sold it on. I upgraded from the 125 to a Beta 200 last year and find the extra power and torque makes it easier to ride. I'm very happy with it. The call of vintage trials was still strong, so I went for one more try. The series allows air cooled monoshocks up to 1991, so I decided to go for something that had front and rear disc brakes and a clutch that I could use like a modern bike.... I ended up with a 1987 Beta TR34 260. It's works well for it's intended purpose, riding 3 or 4 vintage trials a year and a little practice. I ride my 2021 Beta 200 Factory 3 or 4 days a week practicing and I'll ride about 15 trials this year. Alexz is a great rider, but I don't see him riding twin shock events. I just did a quick look at his IG account and one pic of a twin shock Greeves build by some friend of his. Did he let you ride his Vertigo?
  7. We are very fortunate that Beta USA has a program, to send dealers 4 trials models for a week to set up demo rides. I got to ride new '22 Evo 200, 250, 300 2T and 300 4T, back to back in the same sections that I'm familiar with. I discovered that I'm not a 4T rider and prefer a 2T.
  8. I guess the real question was should you buy a newer bike at this point of your trials journey, not whether you should buy a 200 or 250.... Like other said, keep working on your skills on the Rev3. When you are practicing and competing every week and trials is driving your life.... then start thinking about an upgrade.
  9. I have a '21 200 Factory and like it a lot. If you find a 200 in good condition, at a reasonable price.... buy it. That said... I've had a chance to ride every year standard Evo 250 from '17 to '22, and a '21 250 Factory. of them all, I really liked the '22 250 right out of the box, with the '21 250 Factory a close second. People prattle on about how Beta hasn't done anything and just new stickers, but I think the minor tweaks have improved the bike.The power is really soft and smooth and the bike hooks up everywhere. It turns really well and the suspension feels very good. When I replace the '21 200, I'll probably go with a standard 250. I never felt that way, when riding the older 250's.
  10. From the '22 Beta Factory Model press release "Machined clutch discs: created specifically to maximize clutch precision and controllability in every possible situation and make even the most advanced repetitive tricks easier to manage, such as the rear wheel hops typical of today's riding style - ensuring extreme precision every time." The new Surflex friction plates with the round buttons definitely increase flow and improved my '21 Factory.
  11. Not my experience using the Haase Racing 29mm slave.
  12. I don't see your vids getting compared to Toni's on ADV Rider.......
  13. If you like your clutch.... leave it alone. For some reason Beta clutches are all over the map feel wise. My '21 200 Factory had a super stiff pull and a good bit of drag. I changed to a bigger slave cylinder and Surflex friction plates. I now have a light pull and progressive engagement and no drag. My friend got a '21 250 Factory and his clutch was great right out of the box. Another friend just got a '22 standard Evo 250 and his clutch is like mine was stock.
  14. It's good to be familiar with all the techniques and not to discount any of them... In my area we ride in snow and ice during the winter, as it makes good practice for riding very wet and muddy events during the regular season. The roll up is your friend and a zap that would work well to get you on top of something slippery, instead of driving your rear wheel into it, also becomes somewhat useless. Any aggressive clutch and throttle are not rewarded, but your using correct body position, being light on the controls and momentum is very much highlighted.
  15. I guess I'll join the chase down the Rabbit hole..... I've done a few Ryan Young schools and he down plays the zap these days. He says the zap will eventually limit you, as it's only effective to a certain height obstacle. He stresses the double blip to the extreme, in what he calls the bucking bronco. This is hitting the rear wheel really hard and making the rear pop up.
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