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eddie_lejeune

British Round Today

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I'm just sorting through 250ish pics now. Bike seemed to go okay, but there's something just not right about electric bikes. They don't sound right. Or, they don't sound at all...

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I had a ride on it at the end, its got potential. Just needs a proper working clutch and it'll be pretty good.

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how do you dump the clutch before a big step, you know, if your in a rut, i like to rev it until i hear it rattle then let the clutch out.....how does that work electrically?

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It didn't work, it was just a stop go switch, couldn't be feathered or used for any resistance. The motor itself felt strong and quite progressive though.

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I had a ride on it at the end, its got potential. Just needs a proper working clutch and it'll be pretty good.

Obviously not a no-stop man! :hyper:

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It was me riding at the British Round yesterday on the EM, it was the first British Round I have ever done and it was a little bit hard for my riding level, but managed to get though most of the sections. I'll try and answer any questions.

how did it perform

The bike did very well, I would have thought one of the top riders would be able to win or get at least top 3 on the expert route on this bike. It managed to get up all the steps, and it is so smooth with the power. I don't know how well it would be able to manage the championship route, but then to me most of those sections look impossible on my petrol bike.

how do you dump the clutch before a big step, you know, if your in a rut, i like to rev it until i hear it rattle then let the clutch out.....how does that work electrically?

The clutch is just a switch at the moment, you can pull the clutch, put it on full throttle and dump the clutch, and it will instantly give you 100% of the power, I have not managed to get the hang of this though. For most steps you can just ride it on the throttle, because the motor gives off so much low down torque, it will start to pull even on really steep stuff, where a petrol bike you need to keep the revs up and slip the clutch, on the EM it will just keep pulling up it. It is hard to get used to not using the clutch, because the motor can go so slow, where normally you would slip the clutch going round technical corners, you don't need to with the EM.

the back sprocket looks like a 48toother as well

It's running a 57 tooth rear sprocket, but on a 428 pitch chain. But it's not something that is comparable with petrol bikes. It also runs a belt drive reduction between the motor and the front sprocket.

Please put any picture you got on here, or email them over to me please, would love to see some. Any questions, please ask.

Cheers,

Tim Pearson

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Thanks for the response Tim, I take it then this bike can't be stalled, I am completely ignorant in the workings of an electric engine, does it have any engine braking at all and how many gears does it have or what way does that work?

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Torque from an electric motor is calculated by Power/RPM. Thus, the lower the revs, the higher the torque an electric motor produces, hence the feeling of instantaneous power & why the motor will pull without being revved.

Edited by neils on wheels
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My experience of electric motors is mainly on CNC machines and fork trucks but also on schools greenpower vehicles. Electric motors can deliver a huge amount of torque at low RPM. The exact characteristics of the torque curve and acceleration is controlled by the DC drive circuitry. I am guessing at this stage of development electric trials bikes have little engine braking but this could be incorporated by either a regenerative system (as on F1 cars) or a DC injection brake system.

Even a small electric motor weighing only a few kgs can deliver 10 to 15 HP almost instantaneously from low revs for a few seconds to attack steps. Prolonged production of high power at lowish RPM will overheat the motor fairly quickly though.

I would not think there should be any need for a clutch, and in practice the lack of a clutch keeps complexity and costs down and should be a key advantage of an electric bike.

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My experience of electric motors is mainly on CNC machines and fork trucks but also on schools greenpower vehicles. Electric motors can deliver a huge amount of torque at low RPM. The exact characteristics of the torque curve and acceleration is controlled by the DC drive circuitry. I am guessing at this stage of development electric trials bikes have little engine braking but this could be incorporated by either a regenerative system (as on F1 cars) or a DC injection brake system.

Even a small electric motor weighing only a few kgs can deliver 10 to 15 HP almost instantaneously from low revs for a few seconds to attack steps. Prolonged production of high power at lowish RPM will overheat the motor fairly quickly though.

I would not think there should be any need for a clutch, and in practice the lack of a clutch keeps complexity and costs down and should be a key advantage of an electric bike.

No clutch, does that mean the bike would rides like an on off switch all time?

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It will probably be all we can ride in 20 years, but it just seems like turkeys voting for christmas.

luddite i know.

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