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Bought an Oset 24.0R to ride with my grandson. Nice and quiet so I can talk to him when he rides.

It's a lot of fun but not a replacement for a gas bike. At least not for a heavy adult.

i raised the handlebars and put a wider rear tire on the rear.

Mostly just to make it look "right".

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I weigh 250 (sadly) but it pulls me around very well. My property is very hilly and it has no problem.

My dad also bought one. He is about 180 and it pulls him around even better.

I am in the process of upgrading there brakes just to have one finger ability to stop the tire.

I think the larger rear tire is an improvement. See attached pictures.

 

I think you will enjoy it if your goal is to have fun and not necessarily to replace a full size gas bike.

32496_1494816037886_resized.jpeg

32532_1494816037059_resized.jpeg

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As it looks like the rear tyre makes the circumference a lot bigger  you should also increase the gearing as this will put a lot more strain on the motor and controller. It will also give it better climbing ability. Out of intrest what was the size of the original tyre and what size have you replaced it with ?.

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Original tire is a Vee rubber 2.50-19.

This tire is a Shinko SR241 3.50-19.

 

My Dad also has the same bike.His had the larger tire, mine had the original. We could not feel a running difference but we could tell a traction difference.

On the same hill with the same rider, the original tire would spin, the larger tire did not.

For $50 it's a good experiment.

This picture is a better comparison. I did not have an accurate scale so I showed the weight bias old to new.

20170426_121833_resized.jpg

Edited by mountain man
add picture

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Was there any problem getting it on the rim? Oset told me they have the larger rear tire and wheel from the Junior that is sold in Europe. They said the battery lasts longer for adults with the smaller tire.

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No problem at all. The smaller tire was harder to get off than to put the larger tire on.

I had to add about 3 links to the chain as the higher profile needs to be moved back away from the motor.

The Junior tire is a smaller rim diameter but a larger section tire.

I was quoted about $600 for that setup so I tried this instead.

Even at my weight and this larger diameter it does not lack for power....within reason. It's never going to feel as powerful as a gas bike.

 

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There will be better traction for two reasons, bigger foot print ( tyre )  and less torque (to the ground due to larger wheel circumference ) so less likely to break traction. The battery, controller and motor will have a harder time with a larger rear tyre , so just keep a eye on the temperature of the motor that it do not start getting to hot..    

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13 hours ago, gwhy said:

There will be better traction for two reasons, bigger foot print ( tyre )  and less torque (to the ground due to larger wheel circumference ) so less likely to break traction. The battery, controller and motor will have a harder time with a larger rear tyre , so just keep a eye on the temperature of the motor that it do not start getting to hot..    

Thank you for the advice!!

 

I should measure the circumference of both tires and then change the gearing to bring it back to the original ratio.

Not sure if larger sprockets are available for the rear.

I will measure both and post the difference.

 

 

Edited by mountain man
add information

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The original tire has a circumference  of 74.5 inches.

The larger tire has a circumference of 80 inches.

So it's 7.38% larger.

Rear sprocket is 102 teeth.

Would need 109 teeth to match.

 

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Got it last Saturday. After 40+ years on a gas bike, it's going to take awhile to get used to no flywheel effect and instant torque and power. I have the settings turned down until I get used to it. Just been riding on small banks at home. If it's not raining Monday, I may go to Candytown and try some easy sections.

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mountain man & oldtrialer:

Did you price a replacement battery?

How do you find the throttle for feel/feedback?

I looked at a 24.0 & found the throttle to feel very light/vague compared to all the other Osets from the 12.0-20.0 & the MX which felt very positive, required a firm grip & "snapped back" when let go like a traditional throttle attached to a carb. I was expecting a light throttle on the little bikes for little/weaker hands & a positive throttle requiring a firm grip on the big bike. I didn't ride any, I was just twisting throttles while looking & noticed the obvious discrepancy.

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On ‎5‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 11:52 PM, anachronism said:

mountain man & oldtrialer:

Did you price a replacement battery?

How do you find the throttle for feel/feedback?

I looked at a 24.0 & found the throttle to feel very light/vague compared to all the other Osets from the 12.0-20.0 & the MX which felt very positive, required a firm grip & "snapped back" when let go like a traditional throttle attached to a carb. I was expecting a light throttle on the little bikes for little/weaker hands & a positive throttle requiring a firm grip on the big bike. I didn't ride any, I was just twisting throttles while looking & noticed the obvious discrepancy.

My throttle when delivered did not snap back as it should. A little tweaking and moving the throttle on the bars and now it snaps back as it should.

The throttle moves very easily so the control is entirely in your wrist. Depending on how the "Response" dial is set it either comes on very slowly or hits very hard. I had trouble with this at first as it would catch me off balance and I would dab. I have been riding it more and gaining more precision in the throttle.

We don't realize how much we moderate power with the clutch in our gas bikes. You can be a little sloppy with the throttle but the clutch saves you. On the electric bike it is all in your throttle hand so have to be much more precise.

If I ride with my knees bent a little more I can keep my balance and allow for the jerkiness if I am not smooth on the throttle. You can also use the brakes against the throttle for control.

I have put 203mm brake discs and a different brake in the back for stronger brakes and more control. 

Edited by mountain man

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Regarding the battery,I have heard from $1200 down to $800. Dealer told me that if treated correctly it should last several years.

My hope is this cost will come down over time.

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