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I got to ride with the new wheel this morning. The tire is a radial, tube type. Traction and feel are much improved over the skinny tire, even though it was a bit muddy. I was running 5lbs, pressure. Without the engine noise, you can hear the tire flexing and getting grip. I raised the bars 1 1/2" and made a wider piece of rubber to protect the shock.

 

 

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On ‎6‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 11:47 AM, oldtrialer said:

I got to ride with the new wheel this morning. The tire is a radial, tube type. Traction and feel are much improved over the skinny tire, even though it was a bit muddy. I was running 5lbs, pressure. Without the engine noise, you can hear the tire flexing and getting grip. I raised the bars 1 1/2" and made a wider piece of rubber to protect the shock.

 

 

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Looks good!

Can we see a rear and side views of the rear tire?

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I got back out again today. Left some red paint on a few rocks. Slowly getting used to throttle control. It's hard to keep the throttle on just a little after you open it up to get the front end up and then the second blip to go over a bigger obstacle. I was trying two foot logs and a two foot rock with no drop off on the other side. The short wheel base is the biggest thing to get used to. Have to relearn turns all over again. If I had the time, I would build a new frame with a longer wheelbase. Here are some better photos of the rear wheel and on of the response setting. I wish there was more fine control over the response near the top.

 

Edited by oldtrialer
photos didn't show

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3 hours ago, oldtrialer said:

Lets try the photos again.

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I have had some success using the back brake against the power. Leave the power on but use the brake as a clutch to stop and then instantly get back on the power.Your left hand is already "calibrated" as a power control.

 

I like the looks of that rim and tire!!

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@ mountain man

@ oldtrialer 

Anything new to report on the Oset 24 front? How is the battery life/mileage per charge? I see elsewhere guys riding the EM full size trialer are reporting an hour of run time w/aggressive throttle use. I am hopeful the Oset can do better.

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I rode one event. 4 loops with eight sections per loop, total of 5 miles for the day. On the only fast portion of the loop, at the end of the day, one of the lights went out on the throttle at wide open and I noticed the speed was slower. Still had plenty of power to lift the front wheel. The first two loops I turned the key off while waiting. The last two I left it on. I don't know if that helps or not.

Went to another event and on the 4th section I crashed. I was going uphill fast over some small rough, slippery rocks. I think the rear wheel got caught in a vee in the rocks. At full power it came back over on me and I landed on a rock. I finished the loop and called it a day. Haven't had the time to ride since.

I did weight the bike though. I got 110 lbs.

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This is a question I sent to an Oset design engineer.

There is one thing I’ve been thinking about.  If there was a way to control the power(torque/current) and speed(voltage) at the same time with the throttle, it would make the response more like a gas bike. Less torque and better traction at slower speeds. I’ve been thinking about using slide resistors for power and speed, connected to a quick throttle assembly with a cable. Can the Oset controller handle this. Would it be best to replace the stock throttle with a resistor (what size would work?) or just the speed dial resistor with a slide and bypass the stock throttle. The one complaint about all e-bikes seems to be too much torque at the bottom.

His response

You could setup a switch that would adjust the amps (power dial) of the bike, so for wet rocks you have it set to low and then for big manoeuvres you set it to high, maybe a middle option for other riding.

This would replace the power dial and you could adjust on the fly, any change would take effect when you fully come off the throttle and then back on.

As the throttle is at present a hall effect I don’t think it is possible to switch to a resistor setup.

 

I guess we'll have to wait awhile for a controller that can change power and speed at the same time. I also asked about adjusting the free play on the throttle. My bike has way too much. There is no adjustment. I might try to add more material on the stop. 

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That would be like the Electric Motion adult bike's "125 / 250 / 300" power modes, then.  Makes sense from an electronics point of view, sometimes you might want more power at low revs and less at high ones and there's no way for the bike to read your mind!

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I would rather have less power at low speed, more traction, then progressively getting higher with throttle like a gas bike.

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Hi guys! I'm 6' and 175lbs and I found a bolt on billet riser that fits the handlebars really well. https://roxspeedfx.com/products/indian-chieftain-roadmaster-2-pivoting-bar-risers  Havnt ridden with it yet, but am excited as it's been a bit short for me. That's probably exacerbated by the fact that I'm a beginner to trials from the enduro + road race world.

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On 11/9/2017 at 5:01 PM, drumoto said:

Hi guys! I'm 6' and 175lbs and I found a bolt on billet riser that fits the handlebars really well. https://roxspeedfx.com/products/indian-chieftain-roadmaster-2-pivoting-bar-risers  Havnt ridden with it yet, but am excited as it's been a bit short for me. That's probably exacerbated by the fact that I'm a beginner to trials from the enduro + road race world.

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I like this riser.  Are you happy with it?  I just bought a 24 and think I'll try this.  I'm 6' 180lbs.  Excited to try Trials riding.

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Rode my new 24 around the neighborhood yesterday.  Really fun bike, I'm 6' 185lbs.  I'm still getting used to the throttle response and it seems there's a mid point where the power comes on all the sudden which is a bit difficult to control.  The response knob certainly affects how strong it engages but it seems to always engage at that same point.  I was hoping the control of the power would be more linear.  You guys noticing this as well? 

The braking power wasn't as strong as I wanted but I need to bed-in the pads better first.  I noticed a few have gone to 203mm rotors but not sure if they had to get bigger calipers too?  The brakes need to have enough mass and bit first and bigger rotors disperse heat better.  I don't think heat build up or dispersion is the issue here..  

 

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How about setting sag on these guys ?  The manuals for the fork and rear shock say 15-25% sag but I'm thinking that might be more for a downhill bike.  

I thinking a trials bike should be set up differently and softer on the compression and rebound maybe?  

Thanks

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The sudden power surge is the main problem. You lose traction on the easiest things. Remember, these were designed to teach kids how to ride, not necessarily a great competition bike. I'm thinking about replacing the controller with one that can change the power and throttle at the same time in real time. Some people drag the rear brake to control power. I'm old school, don't use the brakes unless you really need them.

I haven't had any problems with the brakes.

I don't think I have any sag on mine. I took out most of the dampening to make it easier to go over obstacles.

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