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Foot position while wheelie

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Hi all,

I'm new to trial bikes and would appreciate a bit of education about slow wheelie.

After several weeks of practices, I start to be able to reach the balancing point but have problems with the rear brake pedal.

Many instruction say "cover the rear brake" and I have no problem with my dirt bikes doing so.

However, my trial bike has the rear brake pedal much higher than my dirt bikes; I can only bring it down to slightly above the level to the foot step.

Then, I often inadvertently drag the rear brake as the front wheel gets higher.

There are several scenarios I can think of;

1) This is because my body position is wrong during wheelie. I should not change my body position relative to the bike as the front goes up.  The fact I drag the rear brake means, I start to lean forward, bringing my toes down, thus pushing the rear brake. This may be the case, but I have seen many pros keep their position vertical to the ground (therefore learning toward the handlebar) to clear large obstacles. I have no idea how they can do it without pushing the rear brake. Probably by dropping the heel?

2) I should not constantly cover the brake. I should move my right foot only when I need to press the rear brake.

3) I should cover the rear brake, but twist the toe a bit clockwise such that I do not accidentally hit the brake.

4) Somehow I need to lower the brake pedal further.

5) Something else?

Your advises would be much appreciated.

 

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learn to bend your ankle, obviously if you're leaning back you won't have to bend it as far.

You need to cover the brake to save yourself going a*** over tit if you go beyond the balance point.

 

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Is this while standing or sitting? And when sitting where are you sitting on the bike? Its best to sit on top of the rear guard, right at the back of the airbox. And have your arms almost fully extended which keeps your back perpendicular (kind of) to the bike. Its hard to cover the rear brake as you lift the bike into the wheelie, its easy to pop the wheelie and once you have the wheel up then cover the rear brake. I also kant my ankle outwards slightly along with moving my knee outwards, with the outside of my foot touching the outside of the peg. This effectively raises the inside of your foot, big toe area, to allow for brake lever clearance. I think this is what you mean by no.3.

Pros don't always cover the rear brake. When hopping on the back wheel yes, but if you see them do a large lunge across a gap, more times than not there toes will be pointing way down at the start and mid flight, and its only just before the back wheel touches the far side of the gap will they raise their foot really quickly to cover the rear brake for landing.

I think its about time a professional made a riding tips video the way colley did years ago. Think it would sell well.

Edited by faussy

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There is a video out there about body position but might not be what you are looking for :)

image.png.56aa4d7496a091ad3cff3f8efdc5674b.png

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Thanks Michael,

Could you give me the link? The one you posted was just a photo....

Also, thanks Kurtas and Faussy. It starts to make a good sense about the foot positioning.

It is still a mystery for me why the brake pedal is so high (and there seem many complaining the same), but it seems that I need to master some skills about the way I use my ankles. 

Especially the tilting of my ankle outward is something I've never thought about. Given how small the pedal is, that'd be effective.

In addition to the usual longitudinal tilting, just a small amount of sideway tilting would increase a lot of flexibility about how to reach the pedal. 

I'll keep on practicing with those in my mind :)

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the body position one doesn't really talk about wheelies but there are some good points in this one and you can see people rolling there ankle as suggested...

 

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Your natural reaction as to when the front wheel pops up is to put your weight forward to save your a***, but in actual fact you need to dig your feet into the pegs, keep your weight rear biased and canter lever between your legs and arms whilst controlling it on the throttle, clutch and rear brake. 

If you get in the correct position over the rear end, lock and brace your legs and you can control the front elevation by using your arms. 

Practice going past the limit, by anticipating the point of no return and just step off the back holding the clutch and bars to control it

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Years ago i could wheelie a DT175  for half a mile but only by standing on the rear pillion pegs as it was much more comfortable and bring the right foot forward for rear brake .  Do any riders use Decompressor valves these days as they could add engine braking to 2 stroke,s .by use of a extra lever on the handlebar .  

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20 hours ago, DingDing said:

Years ago i could wheelie a DT175  for half a mile but only by standing on the rear pillion pegs as it was much more comfortable and bring the right foot forward for rear brake .  Do any riders use Decompressor valves these days as they could add engine braking to 2 stroke,s .by use of a extra lever on the handlebar .  

That won’t react as quickly as stabbing the rear brake!

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break lever neutral or upper position makes easier! always cover the brake is the best practice! you only move your foot off the break when you need to come really close to the bars during splats, zaps or very steep terrain and only while standing high. if you bend your knees and bring the weight back, foot immediately goes back over the brake. stick with arms and knees slightly flexed to start and rely on brake all the time! good luck 

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Thank you all. I keep working on front up and what faussy and leosantanalg said start to make sense. 

As Jrsunt said, I noticed that I tend to lean forward as soon as the front goes up, which caused my right toe to hit the brake.

I just relax and try to keep my position relative to the bike unchanged as much as possible (meaning rear biased as the front goes up).

Funny that as I get used to the foot brake position of the trial bike, I start to feel the rear brake of my dirt bike too low.

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