Jump to content

Stuckagain

1993 Beta Zero Gara questions from an idiot.

Recommended Posts

I just had the most patronising of conversations with a trials riding bloke who answered all my questions with "well, what do you think...?" and a tone which didn't need to state "you idiot" at the end of every reply. Disappointing both as a fellow biker, and somebody getting back into trials riding. 

Anyway, I'm returning to riding a trials bike for the first time since the 1970s. I had a TL 150 back then. I've just bought a 1993 Beta Zero Gara. In between I've had road bikes and trail bikes of all descriptions, including sticky clutch jobbies.

I'm sure if I spent a day trawling Google I'd find some answers, but I'm hoping here might be more productive, faster.

So, those questions:

1. The clutch is stuck, or, more accurately, doesn't completely free when I pull the lever in. Reading up on here and other places, I gather Beta clutches stick when they've been left standing for a bit. It also seems to be that riding around for ten minutes will usually loosen them up, and kicking over in 3rd gear helps. It would seem replacing the transmission oil with Putoline Nano Tech helps enormously. Is that all pretty accurate?

2. Where is the drain plug? I can see a couple of candidates, but uncertain about which one it might be.

3. And where is the filler? As I alluded: these are easy questions if you know the answer.

4. Worth investing time and effort in pulling the clutch out and cleaning it? I've never touched a clutch before.

Thanks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

The clutch as you say in Q1 is exactly that, they free off with use each and every time.

Q4 taking a clutch apart is fairly straight forward, give it a go,  just place all the bits down on cardboard  in the order they came out.

sump plug is immediately above the hole drilled in the bash plate,towards the rear of the gearbox, for the purpose, you shouldn't, with the plate on reveal any other plugs..

Filler is on the left side behind barrel if I remember correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Hi, many thanks for that. To clarify, sump plug on underside of gearbox?

Attached photo: top left filler...?

Also, minor detail, but previous owner has wrapped tape around the kickstart horizontal "spike" for want of a better word. I assume this is out of some sort of personal choice rather than a rubber missing...? Makes it slippery.

20210216_165846.jpg

Edited by Stuckagain
Adding photo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

It's been suggested that the clutch can be freed up by getting the bike into 4th and getting some speed up, the high rotation speed of the clutch doing the freeing up.

Not as straightforward as that, of course, in the current environment, so I'm wondering if getting it revving in 4th with the back wheel off the ground might be as effective.

Thoughts, anybody?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
1 hour ago, Stuckagain said:

It's been suggested that the clutch can be freed up by getting the bike into 4th and getting some speed up, the high rotation speed of the clutch doing the freeing up.

Not as straightforward as that, of course, in the current environment, so I'm wondering if getting it revving in 4th with the back wheel off the ground might be as effective.

Thoughts, anybody?

The sump drain plug is the large alloy Allen key bolt on the underside of the engine, it should be able to be accessed by a hole in the alloy bash plate. To free the clutch off properly id take all the clutch plates out get some very fine sand paper and gently sand each friction plate. (not the metal one's). using some gear oil on the sand paper on a perfectly flat surface in a figure of 8 or circular sanding motion you don't need to sand much off probably 30 seconds per side  with not much pressure pushing down on the plates. I used p1000 from halfords it's work form a few times over the year's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

OK, thanks for the sump drain plug confirmation. It wasn't immediately obvious because there seems to be some sort of plastic shield which seems to have moved and part-covered the hole. Getting the bash plate off looks to be the first job....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

 ( not beta but fairly similar) Sticking clutches are pretty common, my preferred method is start and warm engine. Push bike and slip it into gear, ride with clutch lever pulled in and slight application of rear brake.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

You might get the clutch to release by rocking it back and forward in top gear without starting the engine.

I had a Beta Gara years ago  and the clutch was pretty poor. Even with new fibre plates and washers under the springs it would slip in 5th and 6th gear. 

It may just be dragging if its been stood a long time but I wouldn't sand a great deal off the plates as the tolerance seems quite small.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

If you want to keep riding without pulling the clutch apart and servicing it, you will find that riding around in a high gear with the lever pulled in will free it up pretty fast.

The higher the gear, the greater the torque that is transmitted by the clutch for the same torque at the rear wheel.

Motor stopped, top gear, clutch lever in, your weight on the bike and push backwards with your legs is another gentle way to free it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
12 hours ago, Stuckagain said:

It's been suggested that the clutch can be freed up by getting the bike into 4th and getting some speed up, the high rotation speed of the clutch doing the freeing up.

Not as straightforward as that, of course, in the current environment, so I'm wondering if getting it revving in 4th with the back wheel off the ground might be as effective.

Thoughts, anybody?

That might work if you work the rear brake against the motor in top gear with the clutch lever pulled in, but it sounds like a fairly hazardous thing to do.

Clutch RPM is not a factor in whether it will free up or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

OK, thanks for the sump drain plug confirmation. It wasn't immediately obvious because there seems to be some sort of plastic shield which seems to have moved and part-covered the hole. Getting the bash plate off looks to be the first job....

Meanwhile, clutch has stopped dragging. Yee-hah. Winning formula was to stick it on a stand running the revs up and holding them there for five minutes in a high gear, then kicking it over in high gear a few times, then some slow speed riding up my drive. It's now fully freed up.

Thanks for the input, everyone. Saved me tearing into the seller or booking a repair slot. The benefits of experience.

Next, more basic questions. If I'm going to go off for some instruction and some pay & play, what should I stick in the van beyond the obvious tools, tyre pump, couple of gallons of premixed fuel cans?

I'll have the correct boots, and I have the rain jacket and pants, but I imagine from trail riding experience that it'll get sweaty. So, what about armour? I have the full under armour top and pants I wear under my leathers when road biking, but what alternative recommendations for maybe elbow, knee or hip protection?

And what about stuff like slightly loosening the brake and clutch lever handlebar clamps for when I fall off?

And the tyre pressure debate. Typical recommendation seems to be 7 psi front, 5 psi rear.

Any other ideas?

Anything else I've missed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Tyres 6psi front 4psi rear

Adjust lever clamps so they will rotate in a fall but you don't want them to slip when riding. So make sure you can't force them round with your fingers with your hand round the grip.

DO NOT do this with bar clamps, if the bars roll forward you will accidentally wind the throttle on leading to a potentially big accident , twist grip must also be tight.

Protective gear:

Boots , helmet, gloves, I wear shin pads between top of my boots and my knees. Modern trials pants have knee pads in which are ok but not brilliant. To much protective kit and you will not be able to move properly so its a risk judgement for you to make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...