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skullforger

Rear brake during figure 8's

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Hi,

As suggested on this forum, I started my trials journey by learning full lock turns and figure 8's. I think I know what I'm supposed to do but I can't use my rear brake during these full lock turns because my foot is all over the place from bending my leg and ankle (O-leg). For instance in a left turn, your right foot is supposed to be on the very right end of the peg, so I can't reach my brake. Is this normal and are you supposed to just use front brake during these sharp turns then? Or do I exaggerate too much with the foot and ankle bending?

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If it's on level ground I would say no brake needed - maybe just cover the front brake. It's a lot of clutch control.

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I would say if you are just messing around to see how far you can lean the bike ...etc then you don't need to worry too much about covering the brake. As you get more familiar with the bike and riding I would work towards being able to cover the brake as it will come in handy in the sections - At least with the EM you don't have to worry about stalling :)

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 You bought an E Pure before you learned how to ride? Electrics are not kind.

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6 hours ago, lineaway said:

 You bought an E Pure before you learned how to ride? Electrics are not kind.

I agree, far harder than a petrol bike, even a four stroke.

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I am trying to do the figure 8's on an uphill slope now, and it's when I'm at the highest point and starting to go downhill after the turn, that I struggle to brake smoothly, not being able to reach the back brake. Is it common practice to just use the front brake in that case? Maybe I overthink it too much but I don't want to learn the wrong technique from the beginning. 

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Front braking while turning downhill is helpful for balance and speed control. Front braking technique is important when you are going downhill and turning from across the hill to downhill because weight is becoming transferred to the front.

Rear braking is important for controlling the bike in turns that require some engine power.

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Sorry to point out the obvious but that's why you practice it. In Bernie Schriber's book he says, "Don't practice what you like. Don't practice what you do well." Braking on off camber turns is difficult. and takes time to develop the reactions that help you re-center as opposed to throwing your ass down the hill. The transition from up to down is one of the hardest to learn because it requires very fine control as the steering geometry and force on the wheels change through the maneuver. It greatly amplifies the jerkiness of the brake response. Especially the front. Same with the down to up transition which is very sensitive to throttle.

Sorry, I don't mean to sound like the guy in the old joke. 
A guy with a violin case walks up to a stranger in NY city to ask directions, "Hey mister, how do I get to Carnegie Hall?". The stranger replies, "Practice, practice, practice."

Edited by dan williams
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Instead of trying to get around the figure of 8 in the shortest possible time, with high angles of bank, try stopping every couple of feet and balancing whilst stationary.

If you are on loose sand you will learn that the front wheel will try to plough straight on.  You will need to pull the front end around the corner, with a movement of body weight.

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If turning a tight circle ie figure of 8 then leave the front brake alone, look where you want to be not directly in front of the front wheel (in this case) otherwise you target fixate. Try just riding as tight a circle as you can comfortably manage in clockwise and counter wise, looking where you want go and not down at the area immediately in front of the bike. If you cannot operate the back brake can the pedal be altered at all to allow you to pivot your foot but still dab the brake. The rear brake accentuates the bikes turning ability provided the throttle is constant and the rear brake slows not stop the rear wheel. An alternative is to use a handlebar lever operated rear brake... this is stunt bike rider and racer stuff that may cause a few to chuckle on here, but it is also used by some handicapped riders. However, if it allows you the option of both foot and hand lever rear braking it might just help you to achieve what you are aiming for.🙂

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