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Have I bought the wrong bike?


Hughie
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16 minutes ago, turbofurball said:

Regarding turning on hills, the biggest thing for me was learning to lean the bike rather than myself, and how the bike will naturally pull in counterintuitive directions sometimes ... I cracked that by going out on my mountain bike and using a bit of smooth railway embankment to practice on

Thats a good idea  👍 

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Hughie, you need to get yourself along to one of the Surrey Youth trials on a Sat. They have an adult trial in the morning, pretty easy. There are a few of the adults that are/were in the same situation as you are now. One that springs to mind is Jim Collins who actually organises the adult event. He has only been riding trials for a year or 2 after many years messing about with cars on track days! He is an older chap like myself (64) so you are a spring chicken by comparison. I only restarted a few years ago after a 30 year lay off, wife thought I was mad starting again just about to hit 60! Mind you I used to ride with Rich's dad back in the day when he was knee high to a grasshopper.

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This one reminds me back in 2001 I sold a bike to an older guy that claimed to be an Expert road racer. He had ridden pavement for decades. He bought all new gear and so looked the part alright. He showed up at the next event and rode the beginner class which is predominately  full of young kids. He barely got through the day. And I never saw him or the bike ever again.

 Trials is not easy as an older adult. Stick with it, you will figure it out. It takes hours and hours of practice, so get lessons as soon as possible. It`s best so you don`t develop bad habits right from the start. Have fun and good luck.

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Hi Hughie, apart from a Beta 200 I think you have bought a bike that should be good for a someone who is new, 125's can be underpowered and "buzzy" depending on your weight, older twinshock bikes are heavy and suspension not as good hence will be more difficult to get around a typical trial. A 250 Rev 3 with slow throttle and flywheel weight should be relatively gentle off the bottom of revs providing it has nothing wrong, only other thing would be cylinder base gaskets or low comp head to soften it more. I suggest trying to get an experienced rider to have a go to confirm its running as it should. All trials bike are relatively powerful at bottom of rev rage as this is type of power they need.

Therefore unfortunately years of riding with bikes which do not require you to learn delicate throttle & clutch control will make it difficult to learn. Just riding round of flat ground learning to do full lock turns and throttle and clutch control will be some help and before to long have some lessons to point you in right direction. I am based "up North" hence can not suggest anything in your area. I have heard Bumpy (near Leeds) is good if you travel as is Inch Perfect.

As you mention this time of year is difficult for starters, its amazing how much easier things are in summer when things are dry and grippy.

Just persevere and I am sure you will crack it and in a few months wonder what the problem was. 

Good luck

Melaba

 

 

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I think I’m getting it now…. There I was thinking it was partly a hardware issue but I wasn’t seeing the full picture. I’m going to join a club that’s not too far way that has a practice ground and will get some lessons as soon as I can - it will be great if I can find someone this end of the country but my guess is I will have to travel.

Thanks for your comments 👍

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Even if you have nowhere to practice, just doing figure of 8's and stop start balancing as smoothly as possible will help you get some connection with the bike and teach you body movement. Unlike road riding, for turning in trials you tend to lean opposite to the bike and also when riding your legs become part of the suspension, this is why you stand on the bike rather than sit. Just learning these 2 aspects makes a huge difference.  

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  • 1 month later...
On 12/1/2021 at 11:11 AM, Hughie said:

So I’m just throwing this up for discussion really… Those who have read my previous posts will know I’m new to the sport.

After research and deliberation I opted for a Beta  Rev 3 250, I tried finding a 200 but had no luck there. Initially I fancied a twin shock, poss an old TY175 or Fantic 200 but the consensus was that something modern would be easier to learn on. 
 

Most road bikes I’ve had have been 4 stroke, I’m a Harley lover and have had 5 over the years and as far as two strokes go I’m a fan of old Lambrettas of which I own one (1961 vintage with tuned motor).

The reason I mention this is that generally I am acclimatised to heavier slower revving torquey bikes in the road bike world, even the Lambretta isn’t a screamer.

I keep getting spat off the Beta and I find it very light on the front end. The clutch is snappy and although I’ve only done three trials I seem to have a habit of inadvertently giving it too much throttle and flipping it, coming off the back usually. I have fitted a slow throttle, doesn’t seem to make much difference to me. I’ve also ordered a stiffer slide spring to give the throttle more feel.

So, taking a view, I’m wondering if I’m using the wrong weapon? Should I have gone for something older, less lively and more sturdy or a modern four stroke such as a Rev 4 rather than the Rev 3?

I’m never going to be super competitive starting at 53 but I would like to plod around the sections on something a bit smoother and steadier than what I have - I just feel it’s a bit too much bike for me, strangely enough. Either that or I need to be able to calm it down a bit until I have a few trials under my belt.

I guess starting out when it’s cold, wet and slippy everywhere is more challenging than starting when it’s dry but I feel I would like to not be so wary of the throttle all the time and more sure footed.

Sorry for the long post. Does this make sense?

Would be great to hear from those who know better than I!

It's practice you need, I found 250 trials bikes pushed me into the bushes, it's 12-18 bhp,it's nothing, compared to a sports road bike or a motocross bike, it's just a different technique,

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