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Intotrials

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About Intotrials

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  1. Not sure if its feasible, but maybe if you feel the rim is shot anyway, perhaps you could drill it and fit a clamp (modified to suit the rim)?
  2. Yeah man, just a warm up for the season.
  3. Stop allowed at this level makes sense. Marking no stop for modern trials at championship level is too inconsistent and puts added pressure on the observer. I started my trials career riding no stop then adapted to stop allowed and enjoyed the "new" format. In my experience a good percentage of the people who complain about stop allowed do so cause they perform better no stop, or feel it evens the playing field (which it can to some degree). In some respects allowing stop can make the spectating more boring than it currently is so to combat that a time limit per section makes perfect sense. I've said it before and i'll reiterate, modern trials has developed into 2 sports. Back when I started out a decent centre rider could enter and compete to some degree at a British/world championship event and have a good go at most of the sections, these days this level has become elitist.
  4. I'm confused??? why would you mark a 5 on each section before you ride them? Trials, much like golf rely s on a certain amount of honesty from the competitor. I ride trials for the challenge of man and machine over terrain. Personally I like to have a sense of achievement when conquering a section and a humility when I fail. If a person claims a better score than they actually achieved then they are only really cheating themselves, and will most likely get found out eventually anyhow. I would like to believe most folk would rather be proud of real achievement over falsely winning a tin pot for the mantle piece.
  5. Yes he is guilty, but I guess they see it a bit like a criminal on remand, where the remand time is taken into account during sentencing. Since he was doped checked in September 2018 and only received notification of his ban recently I guess they saw it fit to negate the results for the 12 month period straight after rather than losing a rider from the next season. Right or wrong I would assume (hope) that they feel that the WTC is in a poor enough state as it is and anymore controversy will just add more fuel to the demise.
  6. I've taken Nox - Pump as a pre-work out supplement while training at the gym. It made me hyper and feel like I had more energy but I lost a bit of coordination and timing as a side effect, oh and couldn't sleep that evening either. It would certainly give him the feeling of more energy but I doubt it would enhance his riding, rather, based on my experience,it would be more detrimental due to the diminished coordination and timing. I can only assume he was feeling a bit off side and low on energy and decide (unwisely or by poor advice) to take it before the comp? Still, a banned substance is a banned substance and any professional athlete no matter what sport should not be using it, regardless of the intention.
  7. The problem being that these land owners may get scare mongered into stopping people using their land, not just for motor sports either! Its a shame that things have got so bad that we have to go through "formal" approval for everything just because of the "sue for everything and anything" mentality of modern society. 😞
  8. I recently happened upon a new piece of ground that would be perfect for trials events and/or practice sessions. I came across it by chance and was rather excited when I got talking to the land owner and he turned out to be a keen motorcycle enthusiast. I asked him if he would be interested in hiring the land out for either events or as a practice ground. He was quite blunt and told me he was not interested because of liability. He had heard a story of a farmer who had allowed MX bikes to practice on his land and even though he had all the riders sign a waiver of liability a person who crashed there was advised by solicitors to sue the land owner. The rider won the case and the land owner had to pay compensation. This sort of thing really, really gets my goat! Decent land is difficult to come by these days and off road Motorsport is suffering enough through bureaucracy. Motorsport is a risk and the riders/drivers know and accept this risk as soon as they take control of their machine, they should have their own insurance in place if they want to ensure financial support after an injury or accept fully responsibility for their own risks and actions. There should be no way an innocent land owner gets sued in the event of an incident, these loop holes in the law should be filled and greedy solicitors stopped!
  9. Not many people do, myself included 🤣
  10. I agree, but we could sit there and say that about all sorts of things in life. I find cricket, fishing, gardening, tv soaps... boring and pointless. Even F1 is boring to watch these days yet still attracts massive revenue and audiences. For some reason or another in bewilderment to us trials fans the majority of people find it boring and pointless. What I will say is, I always watch the indoor and outdoor world rounds and have attended many over the years, but I can see why people in general could find it monotonous at times. My wife doesn't understand the appeal either she always comments when I put it on to watch with "why do you watch this s***t" I always reply with "the same reason you watch soaps". She will not come and watch any trial I ride in, she just says "go play on your big boy toy but leave me out of it, boring" Maybe this opinion is shared by the majority of people?
  11. The difference being that snooker, darts and similar sports appeal to a far greater audience. My Gran used to sit and watch both and enjoyed them, no chance of getting her to watch trials! I agree, you find some MX riders and most Enduro riders either ride trials themselves or enjoy it as a sideline and/or training. But I know many MX riders who think trials is a waste of time, boring and pointless. Obviously I don't agree and try to get them to see the skill and benefits from riding trials for all forms of motorcycle sports. trials just dosent seem to appeal to the vast majority and certainly not to the general public spectators.
  12. Personally I ride for the fun of it these days. Trials is probably one of the safest & cheapest motor sports you can do. Unfortunately its quite exclusive and has never seemed to gain much popularity with the public or in some cases even other motor sport enthusiasts. So for me expecting some reward for a couple of hours fun in the woods is a bit pointless and i'd rather see my £10 I might win go back into the clubs that need the money to enable them to put on the events in the first place. For the young kids coming through I get it, anything that keeps them enthused has my vote! At the higher national level, yes maybe a little help with costs for the riders would be helpful for sure especially for those travelling around the country to compete. But again I don't think entry fees would cover this and higher fees may put the majority of riders off from making the journey, especially if they feel they have no chance of getting into the awards. If trials was a bigger more popular sport, like golf or similar then you could have substantial awards going down to lower places because you would get the backing from big sponsorship deals. But unfortunately its the tin pot end of motor sport so I can't see its popularity gaining much ground anytime soon. Just going back to a point I mentioned. I've competed in a few different motor sports over the years and the general consensus I get is that, even other motor sport enthusiasts seem to be uninterested in trials. Whether they feel that motor sport = speed or not is their thinking I'm not sure. But I have had many folk say to me "trials is boring" the problem is from a spectators perspective I sort of see their point!
  13. I think you are dead right about a stop and a pause. Back in the Sammy Miller days when trials technique was about keeping the wheels turning and throttle control to maintain momentum, then it was easier to define between a forward motion and a stop motion. These days trials is so dynamic, especially at the top level the task of defining a stop from a split second pause, to maintaining forward motion is far more difficult to judge. For the observers its a nightmare to maintain any sort of consistency that is fair across the board. I think in principal the "no stop" rule is/was a good idea as it in theory should level the playing field better and provide better safer sections and less boring to watch for the spectators. But in reality it isn't working because "stopping" in modern world trials is too ambiguous. For it to remain and improve then there needs to be some clear definitive consistency to what is actually deemed a "stop". I don't have the answer and I think most folk are scratching their heads on how to tackle the issue. Personally I would definitely have a 90 second time limit per section, maybe have a pause allowance i.e perhaps a max 3 seconds and I would want to see a larger variety of terrain and section styles included. It seems that the section builders tend to follow a common trend these days which just falls nicely into the hands of Bou and co. If you notice when the sections are do or die style then Bou tends to blow the field away. Maybe add some more trickier stuff in there that gets the riders to think more about lines, throttle control, maintaining momentum and grip... If you notice, other than the big fails, they are the types of sections that take the marks of the riders.
  14. They could have, something like in MX - where they have an electronic radio device attached to the bike which then allows lap timing without the need for someone with a clock. At trials world rounds the timer starts as they enter and finishes as they exit each section. There could be an indicator on the handle bars which shows a count down. Then regardless if the rider completes the section without fault if they go over time they are automatically given a 5. There would be no discrepancy and the observer wouldn't have to worry about a stop watch. The observer could have a receiver which shows him/her the time also. There could also be a master receiver back at the score control that records all the times for each rider per section, per lap. this way there is no doubt or argument. Hey, they could even introduce an award bonus system, where perhaps a rider gets a mark deducted for an accumulation of a certain amount of saved time per lap, who knows 😎
  15. There's no need to have timed sections at a club level. As b40rt says its just a bit of fun for the majority of riders. Getting volunteers to observe is difficult enough without putting them under more undue pressure. At Championship level where the riders are actually professional and are paid to compete then keeping a tight format is a necessity in my opinion. There is generally 2-4 observers per section and the riders have minders, so plenty of support to keep an eye on time. The other thing is, world events should attract bigger crowds, if these crowds start to diminish then there is a problem that needs addressing. If that problem is due to boredom, which in my opinion it seems to be heading that way, then this needs addressing. There's nothing more boring than watching a rider static messing around lining up. The more dynamic a rider is the more exciting it tends to be to watch, so a time limit on a section helps keep things moving. I guess the no stop rule was an attempt to improve this also, shame it fails due to the modern style of riding and current trend of section design.
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