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peterh

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About peterh

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    Advanced Member

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  • Bike
    TRS RR 125 & others

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    Western Australia
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    Male

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  1. Normal, if batteries are coming close to full charge, just before the green light on charger comes on to show full charge.
  2. peterh

    Oil?

    Hi, I have used a 927 castor oil and here are my thoughts. I was using 80:1 in a 98 Octane petrol Smells great - brings back memories and of course is environmentally friendly being a castor oil.Is promoted for a high performance 2-strokes and doesn't suffer the old problems of sticking up rings etc. But is a trials engine a high performance 2-stroke engine? We all like to think the rider is a high performance rider but do we put the engine to the same high performance requirements of motocross or karts. Advantages: smells great (for those waiting in line behind you waiting to ride a section) - might put them in 2-stroke heaven or higher and then they muck up their ride - as long as they do not float through. those using mineral based or fully synthetics won't be able to "borrow" your pre-mix as strongly recommended not to mix castor with others I was happy that I thought it helped ignition and consistency of idle - or at least there was no detrimental effect. Disadvantages: You won't be able to use your fellow riders mineral or synthetic premix if you just need that little extra to complete the next lap of the trial. While I found that initially e.g 3 months, I could still see the arrow and size of my piston with a bore scope but after 6 months or so that disappeared and when I did have to take the barrel off the piston (for another reason) the piston dome and compression insert were caked with a really hard carbon which took a lot of soaking and gentle plastic card easing to decoke my piston dome and compression insert. There was also a lot of really hard caked carbon build up in the exhaust header - took a good amount of heat (butane gun - didn't have oxy-acetylene) and a wire rope abrasion inside to decoke the header (titanium header pipe) Not sure whether it was the 927 or I did not change my muffler packing often enough but when I did it was more oily than I had experienced previously - always having used 80:1 ratio 927 has a high Flash Point temperature - 218°C - might mean less oil burnt off in a trials bike i.e more spread through header, mid-section and muffler I changed back to a fully synthetic with a much lower Flashpoint. Last clean of piston crown and compression insert was a very easy clean. Will see what transpires with the muffler packing in the next 6 months. Those are just my thoughts and experiences. A good link here: http://www.dragonfly75.com/motorbike/oil.html
  3. With regard Fork Oils - there is a very good website explaining lots of things to think about here: http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid and further down the page http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid#Viscosity_Index While it has been around a long time - the information is still relevant. I have then condensed that to commonly known or available names and oil weights (downunder in Australia at least - or known through trials sites). - see the attached PDF file that I have compiled. It appears that just because it says 5W doesn't mean that the oil has the same viscosity and viscosity index (the stability of the viscosity with temperature change) as every other labelled 5W oil. I have been using Motul 2.5W fork oil in my 2015 Jotagas and people are amazed that I am using 2.5W but but but - it is still a heavier viscosity at 40°C than what Tech Forks recommend - OJ Racing Fork Oil Type 01 - which I can't easily find "downunder". Given that Castrol 5W Fork oil is available easily at my local Supercheap motor shop, then I might just change to that - and cheaper than some others. Please note that while ATF has been mentioned as a possibility that ATF while being very well controlled in its viscosity ratings is a higher viscosity e.g 33 centistrokes (or mm/s2) at 40°C and about 7 at 100°C. Just note that I am not an expert at oils but have taken an interest what it all (oil) means and these are just my thoughts. For a Beta 80 I would be going to the lighter viscosity oils. Fork Oil comparisons.pdf
  4. My experience is that at age 11 get her a go on an oset 20 to try out even if to just to get the response "dad, can i have another go". No having to deal with kick starting, hot exhausts, no u se etc.. Can be dialed down to walking pace and has brakes that she may be used to from cycling. The likely smile on the face will be what you want to see. I have an Oset 20 as one of my come and try bikes that i use even for small adults to have a go on. No one has ever said "i didn't enjoy that". See whether you can find someone or a club that can help you try as a trip downunder might not fit the budget to try. Also, better to be too big on a small bike than too small for a big bike. Have fun.
  5. I thought that was normal expectation of the mother-in-law and that was just to be allowed to keep her daughter for each of many years, let alone a good looking TY250, which was the exact bike i had during our courtship. Well done on the restoration.
  6. My experience was no, for both the 2014 and 2015 Jotagas 250. Admittedly i have fitted Boyesen reeds in both bikes and for the 2015 model changed to an OKO 26mm carb as documented in the pages of this forum.
  7. Perhaps an air leak in the carby manifold that you 'fixed' when you took the reed block off and redid and tightened? As you say - go and enjoy the ride.
  8. I have taken a bit of interest in transmission oils and the potential influence on clutch action, cold grab, lightness and/or aggressiveness and then related those to viscosity and viscosity index while also respecting lubrication of other rather important parts and bearings. I have tried different oils and listened and read of others experiences and 'gospels'. I have constructed a spreadsheet and sorted by viscosity at 40°C (see pdf attached) from manufacturers specifications (some are hard to track down) and then found a website (see the link on the 2nd page of attached pdf) where you can plot the change in viscosity with temperature - with pictures put into the pdf. Another link on the 1st page of the pdf explains Viscosity Index and it seems to me that for trials where great variations in speed, load and temperature exist perhaps a high Viscosity Index (VI) oil would be appropriate to maintain the optimum viscosity (if we even have any idea what that would be). For my style of riding (no instantaneous huge splat walls) I like progressive and light clutch action in my 2015 Jotagas 250 and I like to change my oil every 10 hours, so I also like to look at price comparisons for similar viscosities and viscosity index. Of course there is no perfect answer as we are all different in our riding ideals but maybe this sheet might give you something more to ponder and try. There are oils on the list that may not be available where you are, in the same way some on the list I cannot get downunder and haven't tried them. If interested, I use Chief Oil's - Mohican ATF Dexron III (and buy 4L for less than the price of 1L of some other oils on the list). But I am no oil expert and none of the above is validated for viscosities and temperature and thus it is all just my thoughts and experiences and certainly not challenging the manufacturers - or the oil experts. So whatever works and is available for you, works for you; in the same way that what I use and have available works for me. Gear Oil comparisons.pdf
  9. Growzer - being in australia, you could look at tyre downs for off road bikes http://kyaracing.com.au/off_road_tyre_down.htm. won inventors of the year sometime back. I have used these for last 8 years and very easy to use, very stable and keep clean.
  10. I have taken a bit of interest in transmission oils and the potential influence on clutch action, cold grab, lightness and/or aggressiveness and then related those to viscosity and viscosity index while also respecting lubrication of other rather important parts and bearings. I have tried different oils and listened and read of others experiences and 'gospels'. I have constructed a spreadsheet and sorted by viscosity at 40°C (see pdf attached) from manufacturers specifications (some are hard to track down) and then found a website (see the link on the attached pdf) where you can plot the change in viscosity with temperature - with pics put into the pdf. Another link on the pdf explains Viscosity Index and it seems to me that for trials where great variations in speed, load and temperature exist perhaps a high Viscosity Index (VI) oil would be appropriate to maintain the optimum viscosity (if we even have any idea what that would be). For my style of riding (no instantaneous huge splat walls) I like progressive and light clutch action and I like to change my oil every 10 hours, so I also like to look at price comparisons for similar viscosities and viscosity index. Of course there is no perfect answer as we are all different in our riding ideals but maybe this sheet might give you something more to ponder and try. There are oils on the list that may not be available where you are, in the same way some on the list I cannot get downunder and haven't tried them. If interested, I use Chief Oil's - Mohican ATF Dexron III (and buy 4L for less than the price of 1L of some other oils on the list). But I am no oil expert and none of the above is validated for viscosities and temperature and thus it is all just my thoughts and experiences and certainly not challenging the manufacturers - or the oil experts. So whatever works and is available for you, works for you; in the same way that what I use and have available works for me. Gear Oil comparisons.pdf
  11. To close off and thank for suggestions, I have settled on 45 pilot and 125 main with needle clip on 4th groove down - for sealevel and daytime temps ~20°C (autumn in Western Australia). Air Screw is 1 turn out. Runs crisp and clean throughout throttle range.
  12. I have fitted boyesen dual stage reeds to 2010 Evo 125, a 2012 Evo 200 and my 2014 and 2015 Jotagas 250. I haven't used the carbon reeds so cannot compare. Once jetting is optimised (and yes had optimised settings of the carbys with standard reeds before i decided to change), i have found that on all 4 bikes that, in my opinion, there is better stable idle and off idle, an improvement in ability to pull smoothly from low down but also a crisper response throughout the range. By reading the boyesen material the dual stage suit my riding. I dont do splat walls that maybe the carbon reeds would give better top end but i relish the smooth, slow climb, turn and then double blips up and over logs, rocks etc. I think the bike that benefitted by the boyesen reeds most noticeably was the Evo 125, it seemed to give the 125 a lot more low down pull and smooth uptake rather than just have to rev the 125. I admit that with the 2015 jotagas i also changed the dellorto to a oko 26mm and a 5mm inlet manifold spacer at the same time as putting in the boyesens, so cannot be sure what the single effect of the boyesens were on that bike.
  13. Thanks copemech - I might start with what the 2016 specs say and go from there.
  14. Hi, I am the new owner of a 2nd hand 2015 ST125 and yes it is a 2015 model. I am looking for the standard jet specifications for a 2015 Sherco ST125 with a Keihin PWK28 carby. The Owners Manual (hardcopy and those downloaded from Sherco manufacturer and agents sites) give details for a Dellorto for that year for the 125, but the advertising brochure says it is a Keihin PWK28 and the parts book gives both dellorto and keihin parts and various jet sizes. And I am told only the 250 came with the Dellorto in that year. I can find the standard specifications for the 2016 ST125 but would like to check the current carby against the standard specifications for slow, main and clip position on the JJH needle for the 2015 model. Any help is appreciated.
  15. To add to the theme, i use Mohican Chief Oil ATF Dexron III which has viscosity specifications at 40°C and 100°C and a Viscosity Index almost identical to very popular and well known trials transmision brands but pay AUD $30 for 4litres from Supercheap versus the same cost for 1litre for a trials specific gear oil. Makes doing regular changes very economical. And no, despite what you may be thinking on the theme name, Mohican Chief oil is not North American but is from the Netherlands. Almost opposite Downunder.
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