Don't want these Ads? Why not sign up as a Trials Central Supporter.

mcman56

timing for unweighting?

8 posts in this topic

I see that some riders can get a very quick almost explosive jump up from the pegs when unloading.  When I attempt, it feels kind of slow and mostly like I'm compressing the rear suspension rather than pushing my body up quickly.  Does this imply that my timing is off...maybe too early?  I get some lift but not as much as I would like.  I'm 155 lbs if that makes a difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't want these Ads? Why not sign up as a Trials Central Supporter.

OK I wrote a long explanation but it was too much so I'll distill it down to this. After the quick burst of throttle at the same time you jump to load the rear suspension snap the throttle off. If you stay on the gas the rear suspension won't release its energy all at once. Try it with bunny hops. Lift the front end and jump while snapping the throttle off. The rear should lift off when the timing is right. Or try this experiment, hold the rear brake on and slowly let out the clutch and note how the rear end squats. That's the stored energy you release by chopping the throttle.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only way to get the timing right is with practice

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan - Are you saying the jump comes after the throttle burst? 

I'm trying to do it at the same time.  Actually, I'm trying to compress the front wheel on the obstacle, hit the throttle and jump all at the seem time.  Although, there are a number of things that have to happen in a short time period so what I'm actually doing may be somewhat different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mcman56 said:

Dan - Are you saying the jump comes after the throttle burst? 

I'm trying to do it at the same time.  Actually, I'm trying to compress the front wheel on the obstacle, hit the throttle and jump all at the seem time.  Although, there are a number of things that have to happen in a short time period so what I'm actually doing may be somewhat different.

 

1 hour ago, mcman56 said:

Dan - Are you saying the jump comes after the throttle burst? 

I'm trying to do it at the same time.  Actually, I'm trying to compress the front wheel on the obstacle, hit the throttle and jump all at the seem time.  Although, there are a number of things that have to happen in a short time period so what I'm actually doing may be somewhat different.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup two burps of throttle is the easiest to control. The first lifts the front and the second helps compress the front and rear suspension. The jump up and forward happens just before the second burst of throttle. The jump is actually two motions. First forward then up. If you watch Bou and company in slow motion the bigger the hit the further back they start. The up part of the jump really starts with the front wheel contact.

The mistake most people make while learning is staying on the throttle so the rear never leaves the ground and just burys itself at the base of the obstacle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey mcman,

I'm new to trials and got my first bike back in February, so I'm learning myself. I found it easiest to learn the timing with flat ground bunny hops. I crouch into the pegs as I get on the throttle, then jump as I get off the throttle and pop the clutch, allowing the flywheel energy to propel the bike evenly off the ground. If the bike wheelies, it means you didn't get off the throttle soon enough. I'm on and off the throttle before the back tire even leaves the ground. I've seen footage of trials schools where instructors teach this method as well.

 

Someone was asking me to try to get better shots of my hands doing this. This was the most recent video I recorded to try to show my timing. It may help. Spend your next session or two just doing flat ground bunny hops and you'll get the timing down. I'm already bottoming my too-soft suspension so if I want more lift I just give a bigger pop of the clutch at higher revs to dump all that stored energy instantly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now