Jump to content

still trying

Members
  • Content Count

    150
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About still trying

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Previous Fields

  • Bike
    KT250r, Gas Gas JT35

Profile Information

  • Location
    New Zealand

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Sorry about the delay Tony, yep its the same one. When I took a break from trials in '97, I knew if I sold it I probably wouldn't get back into trials. Might start looking for a more modern bike soon, but also keen to pick up a '70s TL250. I'm fixing one for a friend at the moment, what a cool beast for twin shock trials.
  2. I ride a 1995 JT35 as my "modern" bike, and yes there's quite a difference to the modern stuff. Seems like about 2001 there was an upgrade (better brake, clutch feel and weight loss), , again around 2005-10, and the latest bikes with fuel injection and active electronic engine management are another step up.
  3. If your looking for the flat type seal. I used one out of a plastic 20lt can cap, (look around the caps come in several sizes), and are generally chemical resistant. Note; anything that has rubber or silicon in its makeup description may swell when in contact with petrol.
  4. Hi Sam, I've just followed my instructions and the web site has changed so they don't work. Try; Trials Australia, Forums, Twinshock (At the moment its on page 3) "Steer Clear, understanding steering" posted by Guy53, on sept 16 2016
  5. Hi Sam, Have a read of the post in "Trials Australia", its all about bike geometry front and rear. Essentially it ends up as a series of compromises. But it helps you understand the trade offs, and how/what to alter for what effect. Really good for tuning things once riding as well. Anyway, go to; Trials Australia, then; Forums, then; Twinshock and Classic Trials, then; Steer Clear, Understanding steering Hope this helps. I had to read it a few times to get my head around it fully, but it was worth the effort.
  6. Cool project, Love the coffin tank. You'll have a blast, good luck
  7. Personally, I think the TY is a better pure trials machine (light and nimble), but a little under powered. If your just having a play and nothing too tight etc, I'd go for the RL It also does to a point depend on your physical size and weight etc. Back when I was riding a TY175 I was 69kg and would have struggled with the RL, now either would do me fine.. Both look like nice tidy machines, good luck and have fun .
  8. Great time to learn to balance stationary. Once you can do this for say 30 sec, start on hopping the front. Back break on full, motor off, The motion is compress the forks, move body back and up using your legs (they should do most of the work). If you dab on the outside, you moved more that the bike, Dab inside, bike went too far. If you can do this, it is a brilliant fitness exercise.
  9. If you want to read about bike geometry, steering head angles,swing arm angles, etc, go to, "Trials Australia", then; forums; next "Twinshock and classic trials", next, scroll down to, "Steer clear, understanding steering". Its really useful. Great looking project by the way, Good luck
  10. I agree metisse, but then we're back to how many and what mods put you in the "special" class. Cut frames, steering head mods, laid over shocks, removed bottom cradle rails....I feel a headache coming on Initially perhaps set it up to get all those excluded bikes back out being seen and ridden Personally, I admire both, carefully restored/maintained originals, and the creativity of the specials. John, well done, your workmanship looks great, If we didn't know better it looks like a production bike with a different silencer.
  11. Hi, the only thing I've done to my Carb is strip and clean, and make a new bowel gasket. My bike had been sitting outside before I got it in 1989, rode it a few times before storing it until 2014. Found some ali corrosion in the airways. bit of a mission to clear but got there. Since cleaning and putting motor in the new frame (see projects) its been faultless. Original bike was pretty rough
  12. Oh be careful not to overdo it and have valve seats etc come out, Good luck
  13. As above, heating the head is the way to go. From experience you'll be heading for around 400 C, At work I use the oxy acytlene torch for this, but at home I use an LPG burner, (its a little safer as far as melting the work goes). The thread in the head may get damaged as the studs come out, so I'd suggest helli-coiling or using thread inserts after extraction in the head. Then you can use, bolts, capscrews or studs, and they will be more serviceable.
  14. still trying

    Yamaha ty250a

    I've got a KT 250 with original DID rims and the tubeless tire kept coming off, (front and rear). I used a sanding disc on an angle grinder and removed the tubeless sealing lip from the tire bead and no more problem. The bead land on the rims I have is small (narrow) and the seal lip sat on the radius to the spoke valley, so when the pressure was less than 30 psi it pulled the bead off the seat. My suggestion is to try unmodified first and go from there. As far as using a tube in a tubeless tire, No problem at all. The biggest difference I can find is that the tubeless tire has a lip on the inside edge of the bead to seal against the small ridge at the inside edge of the bead seat of a tubeless rim.
×
×
  • Create New...