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gasmatt

How To Tie Bike Down In Back Of Van?

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Hey everyone quick question, i have been strapping my bike into van by putting front wheel up against bulkhead then running 2 ratchet strap from handlebars to anchor points left and right on bulkhead. Seemed pretty easy and held bike solid. Mate of mine said this is a no go as will damage front forks (presume because they under compression while transporting) But couple of other guys at club said its fine. Who is right ? Hopefully its fine as its def easiest way I've found to hold bike securely but if not how else does anyone strap bikes up? 

 

Thanks 

 

Matt

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Which do you think might be worse, being held under slight tension against a bulkhead or suddenly fully compressed against a rock face in second gear (which is what they are designed for)?

Bikes have been transported your way for decades with no apparent problems.

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You don't need to ratchet the forks fully compressed, which could put the seals under prolonged pressure that they are not designed to take.

Just compress them enough to stop your straps rattling loose when the van/bike bounce around over bumps.

It doesn't need a lot.

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Recently i have moved honda xl and enfield bullet in friends small van. . Moved the bike in van from back wheel first .. keep the front wheel hanging in the air .. while i was holding the bike from back wheel

Remove the front wheel push the bike back .. put the front wheel on ground adjust it to van wall and bike .so bike wont move .. you can put strap for better hold ..

We havet notice any damage to forks so far ☺☺☺

I hope this helps regards

Edited by bsa4life

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Which do you think might be worse, being held under slight tension against a bulkhead or suddenly fully compressed against a rock face in second gear (which is what they are designed for)?

Bikes have been transported your way for decades with no apparent problems.

 

:agreed: 

 

been doing it for 20+ years without a problem!

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You don't need to ratchet the forks fully compressed, which could put the seals under prolonged pressure that they are not designed to take.

I think that's largely a problem in theory only. I'm old enough to remember the mercifully brief air fork era when folk just fitted new fork tops and pumped them up to suit but don't recall seal failure due to pressure as being an issue in practice.

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Cool thanks everyone for your replies i keep doing it as i have been. Seems by far the easiest way which is a bonus as my lack of technique leads to total exhaustion after a few hours practice .....

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I`ve been doing it since 1970 (And today too) I`ll be doing it this way till I can`t ride, which means I`m dead.

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Yes people have been doing it, and will keep on doing it. I've done it twice whit getting help from previous owner of the bikes in question on pickup. Both times I failed on checking the tension. Both times the seals started to leak after transport.

I'm all for letting the bikes suspension do what it is supposed to, even on the trailer. I.e clamping down the wheels/swingarm and let it move by itself.

Securing it sideways only over the handlebars (i.e mounting the side points higher up so it doesn't push down as much/at all).

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Yes people have been doing it, and will keep on doing it. I've done it twice whit getting help from previous owner of the bikes in question on pickup. Both times I failed on checking the tension. Both times the seals started to leak after transport.

 

I would guess this is more to do with the condition of the seals, rather than the method of transport

 

Been doing it for years without a single problem. :thumbup: 

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Do not strap them too thight no reason for it, and if I let it overnight or something I undo the straps. Not for the seals, but for the springs.

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I would guess this is more to do with the condition of the seals, rather than the method of transport

 

Been doing it for years without a single problem. :thumbup: 

 

The first bike, absolutely, they were crap. (and in that case the whole bike was covered in fork oil after transport)

The second one, no leaks what so ever. until after transport.

It annoys me that so many do it more or less daily without any issues but as soon as I do it something brakes down :P

Nah, I'll stick with the wheel clamp and straps to the sides!

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