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2stroke4stroke

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About 2stroke4stroke

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  1. Expect a visit from social services on Monday when he tells the story at school☺
  2. There may be a possibility that the larger diameter forks will not be eligible for some twin shock events?
  3. I will put money on it being Derby.
  4. And I am trying to put the feedback in to perspective for those fortunate enough not to be old farts.
  5. b40rt is right, certainly for trials in Scotland. Re point 2, someone upthread mentioned this though I can't help but think if they had looked at the ACU rules, and they signed to say they had, then their bewilderment might have been substantially lessened. As with any competitive sport, at least have a look at the basics of the rules beforehand. In my experience an obvious beginner is always taken in hand by somebody, such is the friendly nature of the sport. If you don't want to be "competitive" then fine but don't be unhappy when you find out that it is a competition that people wish to be taken reasonably seriously and indeed (another point raised earlier) where riders have been happily negotiating the same between section going for many decades without issue or injury. On which point, I have travelled to ride in the northern part of the NE Centre for near fifty years and the easy route comprises the same sections, or easier, as were in use those decades ago by the heavy bikes, on 4 ply tyres, that b40rt mentions. That being the case I don't feel they represent an undue hazard to a beginner on a modern bike. Part of the modern approach to things I suppose, and you might be surprised how many riders don't seem to have much knowledge of the correct scoring methodology/definition of section boundaries, judging by lines one sees used and the resulting scores at some observe yourself events.
  6. I think you'll find that, like the rest of the post, it is an ironic reference to the somewhat tortured dialect of the TV commentator?
  7. Sounds like Montesa had you in mind when they designed the 4Ride?
  8. That would mean riders planning in advance (which we all seemed to cope with when entries had to be in a week beforehand) but less likely now. Then complaining because they didn't get refunded when they couldn't be bothered going on the day due to weather/hard Saturday night etc. And you wouldn't get the crack in the signing on queue either.
  9. I have ridden a Triumph twin and various Enfields, the best of which was in a Crusader frame. I have no personal experience of what the currently available "modern" Pre 65' s are like to ride (should you wish to remortgage). Within the context of your question - did you ever try riding one of your British road bikes off road? Imagine one of those bikes with slightly softer suspension and lower gearing (but nothing as low as a Yam). Putting an Enfield through a section is much like that. Bouncy, heavy, imperfect geometry, nae brakes, heavy controls. I very much enjoyed riding the Enfield and still have the trophies to show a couple of leaderboard results but realised sometime in my Fifties that I was beyond making a competent go of it, mainly due to the weight, but I suppose that was no surprise to rediscover what young men had discovered in the Sixties. Get things right and it's OK but once in trouble it's hard to get back. Realistically, it wouldn't compare even with your old Mont - there's a reason why everyone went Spanish!
  10. I have ridden a Triumph twin and various Enfields, the best of which was in a Crusader frame. I have no idea what the currently available "modern" Pre 65s are like to ride (should you wish to remortgage), but results would indicate nothing like a "real" Pre 65. Within the context of your question - did you ever try riding one of your British road bikes off road? Imagine one of those bikes with slightly softer suspension and lower gearing (but nothing as low as a Yam). Putting an Enfield through a section is much like that. Bouncy, heavy, imperfect geometry, nae brakes, heavy controls. I very much enjoyed riding the Enfield and still have the trophies to show a couple of leaderboard results but realised sometime in my Fifties that I was beyond making a competent go of it. Engine response means you have to plan ahead as, while they will plonk, they can take off a bit when you open them up in a tight section such as they were never intended to be ridden in. Realistically, it wouldn't even compare with your old Mont - there's a reason why everyone went Spanish!
  11. It's not quite the same thing but there are plenty of monocular trials riders, so full vision would not appear to be an absolute necessity for successful trials riding. Perhaps you could try cycling on rough terrain to see how you feel before investing in a trials bike? Technically, I think ACU rules call for a road licence but I'm sure there must be official ways round this.
  12. Indeed, and they're not afraid to make mistakes - only Honda could produce a pushrod motor with camchain problems☺
  13. The 200 system is much more reliable than that on the larger models. After 12 years the trigger coils on mine needed to be replaced. There are a couple of places in UK that can do this - worth investigating if this is the problem. Post edit - somehow I mistakenly read that yours was a 200 but the above may apply in any case.
  14. If you really feel that the front needs to be lighter for performance reasons (though the results of others would suggest there is not a problem), a wheel is only tinkering round the edges of the issue. Moving the footrests back would surely have a much greater effect on the liftability of the front end, if that is what you seek to address, but would have other effects also of course.
  15. "Getting hard to find at this price level". That's true!